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Article: An fMRI study of somatosensory-implicated acupuncture points in stable somatosensory stroke patients

TitleAn fMRI study of somatosensory-implicated acupuncture points in stable somatosensory stroke patients
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1053-1807/
Citation
Journal Of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2006, v. 24 n. 5, p. 1018-1024 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To assess differences In brain responses between stroke patients and controls to tactile and electrical acupuncture stimulation using functional MRI (fMRI). Materials and Methods: A total of 12 male, clinically stable stroke patients with left side somatosensory deficits, and 12 age-matched male control subjects were studied. fMRI was performed with two different paradigms; namely, tactile stimuli and electrical stimulation at acupuncture points LI4 and LI11 on the affected side of the body. fMRI data were analyzed using SPM99. Results: Tactile stimulation in both patients and controls produced significant activation in primary and secondary sensory and motor cortical areas and cerebellum. Greater activation was present In patients than controls in the somatosensory cortex with both the tactile task and the acupuncture point (acupoint) stimulation. Activation was greater during the tactile task than the acupuncture stimulation in patients and normal controls. Conclusion: Differences observed between patients and controls on both tasks may indicate compensatory over recruitment of neocortical areas involved in somatosensory perception in the stroke patients. The observed differences between patients and controls on the acupoint stimulation task may also indicate that stimulation of acupoints used therapeutically to enhance recovery from stroke, selectively activates areas thought to be involved in mediating recovery from stroke via functional plasticity. fMRI of acupoint stimulation may illustrate the functional substrate of the therapeutically beneficial effect of acupuncture in stroke rehabilitation. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155345
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.25
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.683
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorJack Jr, CRen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, ESen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:33:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:33:00Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2006, v. 24 n. 5, p. 1018-1024en_US
dc.identifier.issn1053-1807en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155345-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To assess differences In brain responses between stroke patients and controls to tactile and electrical acupuncture stimulation using functional MRI (fMRI). Materials and Methods: A total of 12 male, clinically stable stroke patients with left side somatosensory deficits, and 12 age-matched male control subjects were studied. fMRI was performed with two different paradigms; namely, tactile stimuli and electrical stimulation at acupuncture points LI4 and LI11 on the affected side of the body. fMRI data were analyzed using SPM99. Results: Tactile stimulation in both patients and controls produced significant activation in primary and secondary sensory and motor cortical areas and cerebellum. Greater activation was present In patients than controls in the somatosensory cortex with both the tactile task and the acupuncture point (acupoint) stimulation. Activation was greater during the tactile task than the acupuncture stimulation in patients and normal controls. Conclusion: Differences observed between patients and controls on both tasks may indicate compensatory over recruitment of neocortical areas involved in somatosensory perception in the stroke patients. The observed differences between patients and controls on the acupoint stimulation task may also indicate that stimulation of acupoints used therapeutically to enhance recovery from stroke, selectively activates areas thought to be involved in mediating recovery from stroke via functional plasticity. fMRI of acupoint stimulation may illustrate the functional substrate of the therapeutically beneficial effect of acupuncture in stroke rehabilitation. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1053-1807/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Mapping - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshElectric Stimulation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshEvoked Potentials, Somatosensoryen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshStroke - Physiopathology - Therapyen_US
dc.titleAn fMRI study of somatosensory-implicated acupuncture points in stable somatosensory stroke patientsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYang, ES:esyang@hkueee.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYang, ES=rp00199en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jmri.20702en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16969787-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33750447032en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros115221-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33750447032&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume24en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage1018en_US
dc.identifier.epage1024en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000241648400009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, G=35767974200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJack Jr, CR=18033457700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, ES=7202021229en_US

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