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Article: Superconducting RF coils for clinical MR imaging at low field

TitleSuperconducting RF coils for clinical MR imaging at low field
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/arad
Citation
Academic Radiology, 2003, v. 10 n. 9, p. 978-987 How to Cite?
AbstractRationale and Objectives. A number of recent reports in the MRI literature have established that substantial signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gains can be achieved with small samples or low resonance frequencies, through the use of high-quality factor high-temperature superconducting (HTS) RF receive coils. We show the application of HTS coils to the imaging of human subjects with improved SNR compared with copper coils. Materials and Methods. HTS coils were constructed from 7.62-cm YBa 2Cur 3O 7_δ thin films on LaAlO 3 substrate and cooled in a liquid nitrogen cryostat. Human and phantom images were acquired on a 0.2-T scanner. The SNR improvements compared with equivalent-sized copper coils are reported. Results. SNR gains of 2.8-fold and 1.4-fold were observed in images of a phantom acquired with an HTS coil versus a room temperature copper coil and a liquid nitrogen-cooled copper coil, respectively. Preliminary results suggest higher image quality can be obtained in vivo with an HTS coil compared with copper coil imaging. Images of human orbit, brain, temporomandibular joint, and wrist are presented. Conclusion. The experimental results show that benefits can be expected from application of HTS surface coils in human MR imaging with low-field scanners. These potential benefits justify the continued development of practical HTS coil imaging systems despite the considerable technical difficulties involved in cryostat and coil design. © AUR, 2003.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155215
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.966
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.008
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMa, QYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KCen_US
dc.contributor.authorKacher, DFen_US
dc.contributor.authorGao, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorChow, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, KKen_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, ESen_US
dc.contributor.authorYoung, GSen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, JRen_US
dc.contributor.authorJolesz, FAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:32:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:32:24Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationAcademic Radiology, 2003, v. 10 n. 9, p. 978-987en_US
dc.identifier.issn1076-6332en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155215-
dc.description.abstractRationale and Objectives. A number of recent reports in the MRI literature have established that substantial signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gains can be achieved with small samples or low resonance frequencies, through the use of high-quality factor high-temperature superconducting (HTS) RF receive coils. We show the application of HTS coils to the imaging of human subjects with improved SNR compared with copper coils. Materials and Methods. HTS coils were constructed from 7.62-cm YBa 2Cur 3O 7_δ thin films on LaAlO 3 substrate and cooled in a liquid nitrogen cryostat. Human and phantom images were acquired on a 0.2-T scanner. The SNR improvements compared with equivalent-sized copper coils are reported. Results. SNR gains of 2.8-fold and 1.4-fold were observed in images of a phantom acquired with an HTS coil versus a room temperature copper coil and a liquid nitrogen-cooled copper coil, respectively. Preliminary results suggest higher image quality can be obtained in vivo with an HTS coil compared with copper coil imaging. Images of human orbit, brain, temporomandibular joint, and wrist are presented. Conclusion. The experimental results show that benefits can be expected from application of HTS surface coils in human MR imaging with low-field scanners. These potential benefits justify the continued development of practical HTS coil imaging systems despite the considerable technical difficulties involved in cryostat and coil design. © AUR, 2003.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/araden_US
dc.relation.ispartofAcademic Radiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Anatomy & Histologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEquipment Designen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging - Instrumentationen_US
dc.subject.meshOrbit - Anatomy & Histologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhantoms, Imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshTemporomandibular Joint - Anatomy & Histologyen_US
dc.subject.meshWrist - Anatomy & Histologyen_US
dc.titleSuperconducting RF coils for clinical MR imaging at low fielden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYang, ES:esyang@hkueee.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYang, ES=rp00199en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1076-6332(03)00110-7en_US
dc.identifier.pmid13678086-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0042819788en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0042819788&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume10en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage978en_US
dc.identifier.epage987en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000185068400004-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMa, QY=7402815617en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KC=34968940300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKacher, DF=6701461345en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGao, E=7101941150en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, MS=7201688137en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KK=35222708000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, H=7407449702en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, ES=7202021229en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYoung, GS=7402900506en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMiller, JR=37023902300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJolesz, FA=20634453500en_US

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