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Article: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging tracks changes in organ and tissue mass in obese and aging rats

TitleHigh-resolution magnetic resonance imaging tracks changes in organ and tissue mass in obese and aging rats
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherAmerican Physiological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://intl-ajpregu.physiology.org
Citation
American Journal Of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative And Comparative Physiology, 2002, v. 282 n. 3 51-3, p. R890-R899 How to Cite?
AbstractMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the ability to discriminate between various soft tissues in vivo. Whole body, specific organ, total adipose tissue (TAT), intra-abdominal adipose tissue (IAAT), and skeletal muscle (SM) weights determined by MRI were compared with weights determined by dissection and chemical analysis in two studies with male Sprague-Dawley rats. A 4.2-T MRI machine acquired high-resolution, in vivo, longitudinal whole body images of rats as they developed obesity or aged. Weights of the whole body and specific tissues were determined using computer image analysis software, including semiautomatic segmentation algorithms for volume calculations. High correlations were found for body weight (r = 0.98), TAT (r = 0.99), and IAAT (r = 0.98) between MRI and dissection and chemical analyses. MRI estimated the weight of the brain, kidneys, and spleen with high accuracy (r > 0.9), but overestimated IAAT, SM, and liver volumes. No differences were detected in organ weights using MRI and dissection measurements. Longitudinal MRI measurements made during the development of obesity and aging accurately represented changes in organ and tissue mass.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155160
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.168
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.663
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorVasselli, JRen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, EXen_US
dc.contributor.authorBoozer, CNen_US
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:32:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:32:07Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative And Comparative Physiology, 2002, v. 282 n. 3 51-3, p. R890-R899en_US
dc.identifier.issn0363-6119en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155160-
dc.description.abstractMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the ability to discriminate between various soft tissues in vivo. Whole body, specific organ, total adipose tissue (TAT), intra-abdominal adipose tissue (IAAT), and skeletal muscle (SM) weights determined by MRI were compared with weights determined by dissection and chemical analysis in two studies with male Sprague-Dawley rats. A 4.2-T MRI machine acquired high-resolution, in vivo, longitudinal whole body images of rats as they developed obesity or aged. Weights of the whole body and specific tissues were determined using computer image analysis software, including semiautomatic segmentation algorithms for volume calculations. High correlations were found for body weight (r = 0.98), TAT (r = 0.99), and IAAT (r = 0.98) between MRI and dissection and chemical analyses. MRI estimated the weight of the brain, kidneys, and spleen with high accuracy (r > 0.9), but overestimated IAAT, SM, and liver volumes. No differences were detected in organ weights using MRI and dissection measurements. Longitudinal MRI measurements made during the development of obesity and aging accurately represented changes in organ and tissue mass.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://intl-ajpregu.physiology.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAging - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Compositionen_US
dc.subject.meshDissectionen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshObesity - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshOrgan Size - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawleyen_US
dc.subject.meshReference Valuesen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titleHigh-resolution magnetic resonance imaging tracks changes in organ and tissue mass in obese and aging ratsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWu, EX:ewu1@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWu, EX=rp00193en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid11832412-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036080674en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036080674&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume282en_US
dc.identifier.issue3 51-3en_US
dc.identifier.spageR890en_US
dc.identifier.epageR899en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000173779200033-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, H=36827331000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVasselli, JR=7003912429en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, EX=7202128034en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBoozer, CN=7006060792en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGallagher, D=7201610333en_US

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