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Article: Imaging physiologic dysfunction neurotechnique of individual hippocampal subregions in humans and genetically modified mice
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TitleImaging physiologic dysfunction neurotechnique of individual hippocampal subregions in humans and genetically modified mice
 
AuthorsSmall, SA1
Wu, EX1
Bartsch, D1
Perera, GM1
Lacefield, CO1
Delapaz, R1
Mayeux, R1
Stern, Y1
Kandel, ER1
 
Issue Date2000
 
PublisherCell Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/neuron
 
CitationNeuron, 2000, v. 28 n. 3, p. 653-664 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0896-6273(00)00144-6
 
AbstractWe have developed a variant of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) designed to be sensitive to static neuronal function. This method is based on resting instead of dynamic changes in oxygen-dependent signal and therefore allows for a spatial resolution that can detect signal from different hippocampal subregions in human subjects as well as in mice. We found that hippocampal signal was significantly diminished in elderly subjects with memory decline compared to age-matched controls, and different subjects showed dysfunction in different subregions. Among healthy elders, signal intensity from the subiculum was correlated selectively with memory performance. This method does not require an activation task; it can be used in anesthetized normal and in genetically modified and cognitively impaired mice. In mice the signal was found to be sufficiently sensitive to detect functional changes in the absence of underlying anatomical changes.
 
ISSN0896-6273
2013 Impact Factor: 15.982
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 12.845
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0896-6273(00)00144-6
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000166057500007
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorSmall, SA
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, EX
 
dc.contributor.authorBartsch, D
 
dc.contributor.authorPerera, GM
 
dc.contributor.authorLacefield, CO
 
dc.contributor.authorDelapaz, R
 
dc.contributor.authorMayeux, R
 
dc.contributor.authorStern, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorKandel, ER
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:32:02Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:32:02Z
 
dc.date.issued2000
 
dc.description.abstractWe have developed a variant of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) designed to be sensitive to static neuronal function. This method is based on resting instead of dynamic changes in oxygen-dependent signal and therefore allows for a spatial resolution that can detect signal from different hippocampal subregions in human subjects as well as in mice. We found that hippocampal signal was significantly diminished in elderly subjects with memory decline compared to age-matched controls, and different subjects showed dysfunction in different subregions. Among healthy elders, signal intensity from the subiculum was correlated selectively with memory performance. This method does not require an activation task; it can be used in anesthetized normal and in genetically modified and cognitively impaired mice. In mice the signal was found to be sufficiently sensitive to detect functional changes in the absence of underlying anatomical changes.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationNeuron, 2000, v. 28 n. 3, p. 653-664 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0896-6273(00)00144-6
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0896-6273(00)00144-6
 
dc.identifier.epage664
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000166057500007
 
dc.identifier.issn0896-6273
2013 Impact Factor: 15.982
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 12.845
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid11163257
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034517627
 
dc.identifier.spage653
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155140
 
dc.identifier.volume28
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherCell Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/neuron
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofNeuron
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshBrain Diseases - Complications - Diagnosis - Physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshCognition Disorders - Diagnosis - Etiology - Physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshHippocampus - Metabolism - Pathology - Physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging - Methods
 
dc.subject.meshMemory
 
dc.subject.meshMemory Disorders - Diagnosis - Etiology - Physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshMice
 
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred C57bl
 
dc.subject.meshMice, Transgenic
 
dc.subject.meshNeurons - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshOxygen - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshPredictive Value Of Tests
 
dc.subject.meshSensitivity And Specificity
 
dc.titleImaging physiologic dysfunction neurotechnique of individual hippocampal subregions in humans and genetically modified mice
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Columbia University in the City of New York