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Article: Clos-knockout: a large-scale modular multicast atm switch

TitleClos-knockout: a large-scale modular multicast atm switch
Authors
KeywordsAtm Switch Architecture
Multicast
Self-Routing
Issue Date1998
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ietcom.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Ieice Transactions On Communications, 1998, v. E81-B n. 2, p. 266-274 How to Cite?
AbstractA large-scale modular multicast ATM switch based on a three-stage Clos network architecture is proposed and its performance is studied in this paper. The complexity of our proposed switch is N\/N if the switch size is N x N. The first stage of the proposed multicast switch consists of n sorting modules, where n = VJf. Each sorting module has n inputs and n outputs and is responsible for traffic distribution. The second and third stages consist of modified Knockout switches which are responsible for packet replication and switching. Although it is a mukipath network, cell sequence is preserved because only output buffers are used in this architecture. The proposed multicast switch has the following advantages: 1) it is modular and suitable for large scale deployment; 2) no dedicated copy network is required since copying and switching are performed simultaneously; 3) two-stage packet replication is used which gives a maximum fan-out of n2; 4) translation tables are distributed which gives manageable table sizes; 5) high throughput performance for both uniform and nonuniform input traffic; 6) self-routing scheme is used. The performance of the switch under uniform and non-uniform input traffic is studied and numerical examples demonstrate that the cell loss probability is significantly improved when the distribution network is used. In a particular example, it is shown that for the largest cell loss probability in the second stage to be less then 10~n, the knockout expander, with the use of the distribution network, needs only be larger than G. On the other hand, without the distribution network, the knockout expander must be larger than 13.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155065
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.3
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.184
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorYeung, KLen_US
dc.contributor.authorKingTim, KOen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, EWMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:31:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:31:43Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationIeice Transactions On Communications, 1998, v. E81-B n. 2, p. 266-274en_US
dc.identifier.issn0916-8516en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/155065-
dc.description.abstractA large-scale modular multicast ATM switch based on a three-stage Clos network architecture is proposed and its performance is studied in this paper. The complexity of our proposed switch is N\/N if the switch size is N x N. The first stage of the proposed multicast switch consists of n sorting modules, where n = VJf. Each sorting module has n inputs and n outputs and is responsible for traffic distribution. The second and third stages consist of modified Knockout switches which are responsible for packet replication and switching. Although it is a mukipath network, cell sequence is preserved because only output buffers are used in this architecture. The proposed multicast switch has the following advantages: 1) it is modular and suitable for large scale deployment; 2) no dedicated copy network is required since copying and switching are performed simultaneously; 3) two-stage packet replication is used which gives a maximum fan-out of n2; 4) translation tables are distributed which gives manageable table sizes; 5) high throughput performance for both uniform and nonuniform input traffic; 6) self-routing scheme is used. The performance of the switch under uniform and non-uniform input traffic is studied and numerical examples demonstrate that the cell loss probability is significantly improved when the distribution network is used. In a particular example, it is shown that for the largest cell loss probability in the second stage to be less then 10~n, the knockout expander, with the use of the distribution network, needs only be larger than G. On the other hand, without the distribution network, the knockout expander must be larger than 13.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ietcom.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofIEICE Transactions on Communicationsen_US
dc.subjectAtm Switch Architectureen_US
dc.subjectMulticasten_US
dc.subjectSelf-Routingen_US
dc.titleClos-knockout: a large-scale modular multicast atm switchen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYeung, KL:kyeung@eee.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, KL=rp00204en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032000177en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032000177&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volumeE81-Ben_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage266en_US
dc.identifier.epage274en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KS=8338485100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, S=36604209900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, KL=7202424908en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKingTim, KO=6504719017en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, EWM=7403161786en_US

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