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Article: New evidence for a trophic relationship between the dinosaurs Velociraptor and Protoceratops

TitleNew evidence for a trophic relationship between the dinosaurs Velociraptor and Protoceratops
Authors
KeywordsBehaviour
Ceratopsia
Dromaeosauridae
Hunting
Predation
Scavenging
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/palaeo
Citation
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 2010, v. 291 n. 3-4, p. 488-492 How to Cite?
AbstractReconstructing the palaeoecology of extinct tetrapods is fraught with difficulties. Fossilized evidence of direct trophic interactions between tetrapods is rare, whether the interactions involve predation or scavenging. Typically this evidence is limited to preserved stomach contents or bite marks on bones (when they can be confidently attributed to specific taxa) that make it possible to begin to piece together the trophic webs that existed in ancient ecosystems. The dramatic 'fighting dinosaurs' fossil of a Velociraptor preserved in combat with a Protoceratops provides an outstanding, but still lone, example of the two taxa interacting. Here new evidence of a Velociraptor feeding on the carcass of a Protoceratops is presented, based on tooth-marked bones of the latter that were found in association with shed teeth of the former in Upper Cretaceous deposits at Bayan Mandahu, Inner Mongolia, China. In contrast to the case of the fighting dinosaurs, which seems to represent active predation by a Velociraptor, the tooth marks on the Bayan Mandahu material are inferred to have been produced during late-stage carcass consumption either during scavenging or following a group kill. Feeding by Velociraptor upon Protoceratops was probably a relatively common occurrence. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154756
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.525
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.501
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Chinese Academy of Sciences
NSFOISE 0812234
The George Washington University
Jurassic Foundation
Geological Society of London
Funding Information:

Funding for DH, XX and CS came from the Chinese Academy of Sciences. JC is supported by NSF OISE 0812234, The George Washington University, the Jurassic Foundation, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences through XX. MP was funded by the Gloyne Outdoor Geological Research Fund of the Geological Society of London. We wish to thank the editor and two anonymous referees for comments on the manuscript. Thanks to Phil Currie, Catherine Forster and Steve Brusatte for useful discussions and to Mark Norell and Steve Brusatte for casts of the anterior jaws and teeth of Velociraptor. Finally, we thank Yoichi Azuma and Masateru Shibata for access to the cast of the fighting dinosaurs mount in the Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum, Japan. Preparation work on the specimens was performed by Wang Haijun.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHone, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorChoiniere, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorPittman, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorTan, Qen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:30:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:30:15Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationPalaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 2010, v. 291 n. 3-4, p. 488-492en_US
dc.identifier.issn0031-0182en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154756-
dc.description.abstractReconstructing the palaeoecology of extinct tetrapods is fraught with difficulties. Fossilized evidence of direct trophic interactions between tetrapods is rare, whether the interactions involve predation or scavenging. Typically this evidence is limited to preserved stomach contents or bite marks on bones (when they can be confidently attributed to specific taxa) that make it possible to begin to piece together the trophic webs that existed in ancient ecosystems. The dramatic 'fighting dinosaurs' fossil of a Velociraptor preserved in combat with a Protoceratops provides an outstanding, but still lone, example of the two taxa interacting. Here new evidence of a Velociraptor feeding on the carcass of a Protoceratops is presented, based on tooth-marked bones of the latter that were found in association with shed teeth of the former in Upper Cretaceous deposits at Bayan Mandahu, Inner Mongolia, China. In contrast to the case of the fighting dinosaurs, which seems to represent active predation by a Velociraptor, the tooth marks on the Bayan Mandahu material are inferred to have been produced during late-stage carcass consumption either during scavenging or following a group kill. Feeding by Velociraptor upon Protoceratops was probably a relatively common occurrence. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/palaeoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPalaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecologyen_US
dc.subjectBehaviouren_US
dc.subjectCeratopsiaen_US
dc.subjectDromaeosauridaeen_US
dc.subjectHuntingen_US
dc.subjectPredationen_US
dc.subjectScavengingen_US
dc.titleNew evidence for a trophic relationship between the dinosaurs Velociraptor and Protoceratopsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPittman, M:mpittman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPittman, M=rp01622en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.palaeo.2010.03.028en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78449265913en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78449265913&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume291en_US
dc.identifier.issue3-4en_US
dc.identifier.spage488en_US
dc.identifier.epage492en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278782400027-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHone, D=16241713000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoiniere, J=35277982100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSullivan, C=25627041500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, X=35278991100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPittman, M=35786415100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, Q=35786597200en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike6876969-

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