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Article: The temporal change in the cortical activations due to salty and sweet tastes in humans: fMRI and time-intensity sensory evaluation
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TitleThe temporal change in the cortical activations due to salty and sweet tastes in humans: fMRI and time-intensity sensory evaluation
 
AuthorsNakamura, Y1
Goto, TK1
Tokumori, K1
Yoshiura, T1
Kobayashi, K2
Nakamura, Y2
Honda, H1
Ninomiya, Y1
Yoshiura, K1
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.neuroreport.com
 
CitationNeuroreport, 2012, v. 23 n. 6, p. 400-404 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WNR.0b013e32835271b7
 
AbstractIt remains unclear how the cerebral cortex of humans perceives taste temporally, and whether or not such objective data about the brain show a correlation with the current widely used conventional methods of taste-intensity sensory evaluation. The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in the time-intensity profile between salty and sweet tastes in the human brain. The time-intensity profiles of functional MRI (fMRI) data of the human taste cortex were analyzed using finite impulse response analysis for a direct interpretation in terms of the peristimulus time signal. Also, time-intensity sensory evaluations for tastes were performed under the same condition as fMRI to confirm the reliability of the temporal profile in the fMRI data. The time-intensity profile for the brain activations due to a salty taste changed more rapidly than those due to a sweet taste in the human brain cortex and was also similar to the time-intensity sensory evaluation, confirming the reliability of the temporal profile of the fMRI data. In conclusion, the time-intensity profile using finite impulse response analysis for fMRI data showed that there was a temporal difference in the neural responses between salty and sweet tastes over a given period of time. This indicates that there might be taste-specific temporal profiles of activations in the human brain.
 
ISSN0959-4965
2012 Impact Factor: 1.404
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.850
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WNR.0b013e32835271b7
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000302525200013
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Ministry of Education, Japan19390479
Society for Research on Umami Taste
Funding Information:

This work was supported by grants from a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Education, Japan (19390479 to T.K.G.), and Society for Research on Umami Taste (to T.K.G.).

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorNakamura, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorGoto, TK
 
dc.contributor.authorTokumori, K
 
dc.contributor.authorYoshiura, T
 
dc.contributor.authorKobayashi, K
 
dc.contributor.authorNakamura, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorHonda, H
 
dc.contributor.authorNinomiya, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorYoshiura, K
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:27:06Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:27:06Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractIt remains unclear how the cerebral cortex of humans perceives taste temporally, and whether or not such objective data about the brain show a correlation with the current widely used conventional methods of taste-intensity sensory evaluation. The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in the time-intensity profile between salty and sweet tastes in the human brain. The time-intensity profiles of functional MRI (fMRI) data of the human taste cortex were analyzed using finite impulse response analysis for a direct interpretation in terms of the peristimulus time signal. Also, time-intensity sensory evaluations for tastes were performed under the same condition as fMRI to confirm the reliability of the temporal profile in the fMRI data. The time-intensity profile for the brain activations due to a salty taste changed more rapidly than those due to a sweet taste in the human brain cortex and was also similar to the time-intensity sensory evaluation, confirming the reliability of the temporal profile of the fMRI data. In conclusion, the time-intensity profile using finite impulse response analysis for fMRI data showed that there was a temporal difference in the neural responses between salty and sweet tastes over a given period of time. This indicates that there might be taste-specific temporal profiles of activations in the human brain.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationNeuroreport, 2012, v. 23 n. 6, p. 400-404 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WNR.0b013e32835271b7
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WNR.0b013e32835271b7
 
dc.identifier.epage404
 
dc.identifier.hkuros203955
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302525200013
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Ministry of Education, Japan19390479
Society for Research on Umami Taste
Funding Information:

This work was supported by grants from a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Education, Japan (19390479 to T.K.G.), and Society for Research on Umami Taste (to T.K.G.).

 
dc.identifier.issn0959-4965
2012 Impact Factor: 1.404
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.850
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.pmid22407055
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859420963
 
dc.identifier.spage400
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154718
 
dc.identifier.volume23
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.neuroreport.com
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroreport
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshBrain - anatomy and histology - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging
 
dc.subject.meshSodium Chloride - pharmacology
 
dc.subject.meshSucrose - pharmacology
 
dc.subject.meshTaste - physiology
 
dc.titleThe temporal change in the cortical activations due to salty and sweet tastes in humans: fMRI and time-intensity sensory evaluation
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Kyushu University
  2. Kyushu University Hospital