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Article: Coronectomy of the lower third molar is safe within the first 3 years

TitleCoronectomy of the lower third molar is safe within the first 3 years
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/joms
Citation
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2012, v. 70 n. 7, p. 1512-1522 How to Cite?
AbstractPURPOSE: There is no long-term evaluation on the safety of coronectomy of the lower third molar. The aim of this study was to investigate the 3-year morbidity of coronectomy of the lower third molars and to monitor the behavior and migration pattern of the retained roots after coronectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study. Patients with lower third molars with specific radiographic sign(s) showing proximity of the roots to the inferior alveolar nerve who underwent coronectomy in a previous randomized clinical trial were reviewed postoperatively in the first week and the third, sixth, 12th, 24th, and 36th months. The morbidities of infection, pain, root eruption, reoperation to remove the root, and the development of any pathology were recorded. The pattern of any root migration was analyzed. RESULTS: Ninety-eight patients (35 men and 63 women; mean age, 25.7 yrs; standard deviation, 7.9 yrs) with 135 coronectomies completed the 36-month review. None presented with infection or pain from the postoperative third month onward. Root eruption causing sensitivity occurred in 3% (4/135) of the sample and the erupted roots were removed. None of the reoperated cases presented with a postoperative inferior alveolar nerve deficit. No pathology developed in any of the retained roots after coronectomy. Root migration was noted in most cases in the first 12 months, and all roots stopped migrating from the 24th month onward. The mean root migration at 36 months was 2.8 mm (standard deviation, 1.4 mm). CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that retained roots after coronectomy in the lower third molars produce no complications in terms of infection, pain, or the development of pathologies within the first 3 years. Root eruption can occur in a very small percentage of patients and may require reoperation to remove the root.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154712
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.631
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.824
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, MYYen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, LKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:27:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:27:03Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2012, v. 70 n. 7, p. 1512-1522en_US
dc.identifier.issn0278-2391en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154712-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: There is no long-term evaluation on the safety of coronectomy of the lower third molar. The aim of this study was to investigate the 3-year morbidity of coronectomy of the lower third molars and to monitor the behavior and migration pattern of the retained roots after coronectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study. Patients with lower third molars with specific radiographic sign(s) showing proximity of the roots to the inferior alveolar nerve who underwent coronectomy in a previous randomized clinical trial were reviewed postoperatively in the first week and the third, sixth, 12th, 24th, and 36th months. The morbidities of infection, pain, root eruption, reoperation to remove the root, and the development of any pathology were recorded. The pattern of any root migration was analyzed. RESULTS: Ninety-eight patients (35 men and 63 women; mean age, 25.7 yrs; standard deviation, 7.9 yrs) with 135 coronectomies completed the 36-month review. None presented with infection or pain from the postoperative third month onward. Root eruption causing sensitivity occurred in 3% (4/135) of the sample and the erupted roots were removed. None of the reoperated cases presented with a postoperative inferior alveolar nerve deficit. No pathology developed in any of the retained roots after coronectomy. Root migration was noted in most cases in the first 12 months, and all roots stopped migrating from the 24th month onward. The mean root migration at 36 months was 2.8 mm (standard deviation, 1.4 mm). CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that retained roots after coronectomy in the lower third molars produce no complications in terms of infection, pain, or the development of pathologies within the first 3 years. Root eruption can occur in a very small percentage of patients and may require reoperation to remove the root.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jomsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshMandibular Nerve - pathology-
dc.subject.meshMolar, Third - pathology - surgery-
dc.subject.meshPain, Postoperative - etiology-
dc.subject.meshSurgical Wound Infection - etiology-
dc.subject.meshTooth Crown - surgery-
dc.titleCoronectomy of the lower third molar is safe within the first 3 yearsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, MYY: mleung04@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, LK: lkcheung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, YY=rp01522en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, LK=rp00013en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.joms.2011.12.029en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22494507-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862188436-
dc.identifier.hkuros201199-
dc.identifier.volume70-
dc.identifier.issue7-
dc.identifier.spage1512-
dc.identifier.epage1522-
dc.identifier.eissn1531-5053-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000305812000010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, LK=7102302747en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, YY=34978641900en_US

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