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Article: Evaluation of moldable, in situ hardening calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes

TitleEvaluation of moldable, in situ hardening calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes
Authors
KeywordsBone Regeneration
Bone Substitute Material
Hydroxyapatite
Nmp
Tricalcium Phosphate
Issue Date2013
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2013, v. 24 n. 2, p. 149-157 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Moldable in situ self-stabilizing and hardening bone graft materials facilitate handling and may be suitable for membrane-free bone regeneration methods. This study aimed to compare two moldable synthetic calcium phosphate materials in a rabbit calvarial defect model. Method: In 12 New Zealand white rabbits, four evenly distributed 6 mm diameter defects were drilled in the calvarial bone. Three filler materials were randomly applied to 48 defects: an in situ hardening polylactide-coated ß-tricalcium phosphate (TCP), an in situ hardening polylactide-coated biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), and a granular deproteinized bovine bone matrix (DBBM, positive control). One defect remained untreated and served as a negative control. Six animals were sacrificed after 4 weeks, and the remaining animals were sacrificed after 16 weeks. Biocompatibility, bone graft substitute integration and resorption, bone formation, defect bridging, and height of reconstructed hard tissue were assessed histologically and histomorphometrically. Results: All tested materials showed good biocompatibility. Semi-quantitative analysis and pair-wise comparison suggested that BCP was more efficient in centripetal bone formation when compared with TCP. After 4 weeks, significantly more bone had formed in the defects treated with either TCP or BCP materials compared with the untreated sites. BCP and DBBM did not show macroscopic signs of degradation, whereas the TCP material was partially resorbed after 16 weeks. Otherwise, no major differences were detected between the three materials. Conclusion: The moldable, synthetic calcium phosphates are safe and suitable bone graft substitutes with outcomes that are comparable to the control material. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154685
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.464
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.427
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchmidlin, PRen_US
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorKruse, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorZwahlen, RAen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeber, FEen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:26:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:26:54Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2013, v. 24 n. 2, p. 149-157en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154685-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Moldable in situ self-stabilizing and hardening bone graft materials facilitate handling and may be suitable for membrane-free bone regeneration methods. This study aimed to compare two moldable synthetic calcium phosphate materials in a rabbit calvarial defect model. Method: In 12 New Zealand white rabbits, four evenly distributed 6 mm diameter defects were drilled in the calvarial bone. Three filler materials were randomly applied to 48 defects: an in situ hardening polylactide-coated ß-tricalcium phosphate (TCP), an in situ hardening polylactide-coated biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), and a granular deproteinized bovine bone matrix (DBBM, positive control). One defect remained untreated and served as a negative control. Six animals were sacrificed after 4 weeks, and the remaining animals were sacrificed after 16 weeks. Biocompatibility, bone graft substitute integration and resorption, bone formation, defect bridging, and height of reconstructed hard tissue were assessed histologically and histomorphometrically. Results: All tested materials showed good biocompatibility. Semi-quantitative analysis and pair-wise comparison suggested that BCP was more efficient in centripetal bone formation when compared with TCP. After 4 weeks, significantly more bone had formed in the defects treated with either TCP or BCP materials compared with the untreated sites. BCP and DBBM did not show macroscopic signs of degradation, whereas the TCP material was partially resorbed after 16 weeks. Otherwise, no major differences were detected between the three materials. Conclusion: The moldable, synthetic calcium phosphates are safe and suitable bone graft substitutes with outcomes that are comparable to the control material. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Researchen_US
dc.subjectBone Regenerationen_US
dc.subjectBone Substitute Materialen_US
dc.subjectHydroxyapatiteen_US
dc.subjectNmpen_US
dc.subjectTricalcium Phosphateen_US
dc.titleEvaluation of moldable, in situ hardening calcium phosphate bone graft substitutesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZwahlen, RA:zwahlen@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZwahlen, RA=rp00055en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0501.2011.02315.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid22092691-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84872665177en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000313834500005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchmidlin, PR=7005214386en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNicholls, F=36244274900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKruse, A=26967781900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZwahlen, RA=7004217269en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeber, FE=7201702808en_US

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