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Article: Analysis of genetic polymorphisms in skeletal Class i crowding
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TitleAnalysis of genetic polymorphisms in skeletal Class i crowding
 
AuthorsTing, TY1
Wong, RWK1
Rabie, ABM1
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ajodo
 
CitationAmerican Journal Of Orthodontics And Dentofacial Orthopedics, 2011, v. 140 n. 1, p. e9-e15 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajodo.2010.12.015
 
AbstractIntroduction: Dental crowding is a problem for both adolescents and adults in modern society. The purpose of this research was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) responsible for crowding in subjects with skeletal Class I relationships. Methods: The case subjects consisted of healthy Chinese people living in Hong Kong with skeletal Class I relationships and at least 5 mm of crowding in either arch. The control subjects met the same requirements but lacked crowding or spacing. SNP genotyping was performed on the MassARRAY platform. The chi-square test was used to compare genotype and allele type distributions between the case and the control groups. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals, and the effects of age and sex for each SNP. Analyses of linkage disequilibrium and haplotype associations between SNPs were performed with software. Results: Five SNPs were found to be significantly different in genotype or allele type distributions. SNP rs372024 was significantly associated with crowding (P = 0.004). Two SNPs, rs3764746 and rs3795170, on the EDA gene were found to be associated marginally. SNPs rs1005464 and rs15705 also exhibited marginal association with crowding. The effects of associated SNPs remained significant after adjustments for age and sex factors. Conclusions: This study suggests an association for the genes EDA and XEDAR in dental crowding in the Hong Kong Chinese population. Copyright © 2011 by the American Association of Orthodontists.
 
ISSN0889-5406
2012 Impact Factor: 1.458
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.150
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajodo.2010.12.015
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000292304100002
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorTing, TY
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, RWK
 
dc.contributor.authorRabie, ABM
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:26:50Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:26:50Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Dental crowding is a problem for both adolescents and adults in modern society. The purpose of this research was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) responsible for crowding in subjects with skeletal Class I relationships. Methods: The case subjects consisted of healthy Chinese people living in Hong Kong with skeletal Class I relationships and at least 5 mm of crowding in either arch. The control subjects met the same requirements but lacked crowding or spacing. SNP genotyping was performed on the MassARRAY platform. The chi-square test was used to compare genotype and allele type distributions between the case and the control groups. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals, and the effects of age and sex for each SNP. Analyses of linkage disequilibrium and haplotype associations between SNPs were performed with software. Results: Five SNPs were found to be significantly different in genotype or allele type distributions. SNP rs372024 was significantly associated with crowding (P = 0.004). Two SNPs, rs3764746 and rs3795170, on the EDA gene were found to be associated marginally. SNPs rs1005464 and rs15705 also exhibited marginal association with crowding. The effects of associated SNPs remained significant after adjustments for age and sex factors. Conclusions: This study suggests an association for the genes EDA and XEDAR in dental crowding in the Hong Kong Chinese population. Copyright © 2011 by the American Association of Orthodontists.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Orthodontics And Dentofacial Orthopedics, 2011, v. 140 n. 1, p. e9-e15 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajodo.2010.12.015
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajodo.2010.12.015
 
dc.identifier.epagee15
 
dc.identifier.hkuros195745
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292304100002
 
dc.identifier.issn0889-5406
2012 Impact Factor: 1.458
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.150
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid21724072
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959925202
 
dc.identifier.spagee9
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154670
 
dc.identifier.volume140
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ajodo
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
 
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies
 
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distribution
 
dc.subject.meshDna Mutational Analysis - Methods
 
dc.subject.meshEctodysplasins - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshGene Frequency
 
dc.subject.meshHong Kong
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshLinkage Disequilibrium
 
dc.subject.meshLogistic Models
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMalocclusion, Angle Class I - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshMass Spectrometry - Methods
 
dc.subject.meshOligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis - Methods
 
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Single Nucleotide
 
dc.subject.meshXedar Receptor - Genetics
 
dc.titleAnalysis of genetic polymorphisms in skeletal Class i crowding
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong