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Article: The effect of different implant neck configurations on soft and hard tissue healing: A randomized-controlled clinical trial
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TitleThe effect of different implant neck configurations on soft and hard tissue healing: A randomized-controlled clinical trial
 
AuthorsTan, WC4
Lang, NP2
Schmidlin, K3
Zwahlen, M3
Pjetursson, BE1
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
 
CitationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2011, v. 22 n. 1, p. 14-19 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0501.2010.01982.x
 
AbstractObjective: To compare the soft and hard tissue healing and remodeling around tissue-level implants with different neck configurations after at least 1 year of functional loading. Material and methods: Eighteen patients with multiple missing teeth in the posterior area received two implants inserted in the same sextant. One test (T) implant with a 1.8 mm turned neck and one control (C) implant with a 2.8 mm turned neck were randomly assigned. All implants were placed transmucosally to the same sink depth of approximately 1.8 mm. Peri-apical radiographs were obtained using the paralleling technique and digitized. Two investigators blinded to the implant type-evaluated soft and hard tissue conditions at baseline, 6 months and 1 year after loading. Results: The mean crestal bone levels and soft tissue parameters were not significantly different between T and C implants at all time points. However, T implants displayed significantly less crestal bone loss than C implants after 1 year. Moreover, a frequency analysis revealed a higher percentage (50%) of T implants with crestal bone levels 1-2 mm below the implant shoulder compared with C implants (5.6%) 1 year after loading. Conclusion: Implants with a reduced height turned neck of 1.8 mm may, indeed, lower the crestal bone resorption and hence, may maintain higher crestal bone levels than do implants with a 2.8 mm turned neck, when sunk to the same depth. Moreover, several factors other than the vertical positioning of the moderately rough SLA surface may influence crestal bone levels after 1 year of function. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
 
ISSN0905-7161
2013 Impact Factor: 3.123
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0501.2010.01982.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000285390700003
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Clinical Research Foundation (CRF) for the Promotion of Oral Health, Brienz BE, Switzerland
ITI Foundation
Funding Information:

The authors would like to express their special thanks to Drs Andrea Albert Kiszely, Suprenee Benjasupattananan, Caroline Fischer, Stefan Imwinkelried, Michael Krahenmann, Mette Rylev Agerbaek and Anita Wehrle Fuchs for their clinical work, which contributed to this study. This study was supported by the Clinical Research Foundation (CRF) for the Promotion of Oral Health, Brienz BE, Switzerland. W. C. Tan was an ITI Scholar for the year 2006/2007 (ITI Foundation educational grant).

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorTan, WC
 
dc.contributor.authorLang, NP
 
dc.contributor.authorSchmidlin, K
 
dc.contributor.authorZwahlen, M
 
dc.contributor.authorPjetursson, BE
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:26:42Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:26:42Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractObjective: To compare the soft and hard tissue healing and remodeling around tissue-level implants with different neck configurations after at least 1 year of functional loading. Material and methods: Eighteen patients with multiple missing teeth in the posterior area received two implants inserted in the same sextant. One test (T) implant with a 1.8 mm turned neck and one control (C) implant with a 2.8 mm turned neck were randomly assigned. All implants were placed transmucosally to the same sink depth of approximately 1.8 mm. Peri-apical radiographs were obtained using the paralleling technique and digitized. Two investigators blinded to the implant type-evaluated soft and hard tissue conditions at baseline, 6 months and 1 year after loading. Results: The mean crestal bone levels and soft tissue parameters were not significantly different between T and C implants at all time points. However, T implants displayed significantly less crestal bone loss than C implants after 1 year. Moreover, a frequency analysis revealed a higher percentage (50%) of T implants with crestal bone levels 1-2 mm below the implant shoulder compared with C implants (5.6%) 1 year after loading. Conclusion: Implants with a reduced height turned neck of 1.8 mm may, indeed, lower the crestal bone resorption and hence, may maintain higher crestal bone levels than do implants with a 2.8 mm turned neck, when sunk to the same depth. Moreover, several factors other than the vertical positioning of the moderately rough SLA surface may influence crestal bone levels after 1 year of function. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2011, v. 22 n. 1, p. 14-19 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0501.2010.01982.x
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0501.2010.01982.x
 
dc.identifier.epage19
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285390700003
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Clinical Research Foundation (CRF) for the Promotion of Oral Health, Brienz BE, Switzerland
ITI Foundation
Funding Information:

The authors would like to express their special thanks to Drs Andrea Albert Kiszely, Suprenee Benjasupattananan, Caroline Fischer, Stefan Imwinkelried, Michael Krahenmann, Mette Rylev Agerbaek and Anita Wehrle Fuchs for their clinical work, which contributed to this study. This study was supported by the Clinical Research Foundation (CRF) for the Promotion of Oral Health, Brienz BE, Switzerland. W. C. Tan was an ITI Scholar for the year 2006/2007 (ITI Foundation educational grant).

 
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161
2013 Impact Factor: 3.123
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid21091792
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78650192193
 
dc.identifier.spage14
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154648
 
dc.identifier.volume22
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Research
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAlveolar Bone Loss - Etiology - Prevention & Control - Radiography
 
dc.subject.meshBone Density
 
dc.subject.meshBone Regeneration
 
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distribution
 
dc.subject.meshDental Implantation, Endosseous - Adverse Effects
 
dc.subject.meshDental Implants
 
dc.subject.meshDental Prosthesis Design
 
dc.subject.meshDouble-Blind Method
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshPeri-Implantitis - Prevention & Control
 
dc.subject.meshProsthesis-Related Infections - Prevention & Control
 
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametric
 
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
 
dc.subject.meshWound Healing
 
dc.titleThe effect of different implant neck configurations on soft and hard tissue healing: A randomized-controlled clinical trial
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Iceland
  2. Prince Philip Dental Hospital
  3. Universität Bern
  4. National Dental Centre of Singapore