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Article: Functional analysis of core binding factor a1 and its relationship with related genes expressed by human periodontal ligament cells exposed to mechanical stress

TitleFunctional analysis of core binding factor a1 and its relationship with related genes expressed by human periodontal ligament cells exposed to mechanical stress
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ejo.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
European Journal Of Orthodontics, 2010, v. 32 n. 6, p. 698-705 How to Cite?
AbstractMechanical stress induces human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells to express an osteoblastic phenotype in vitro. Core binding factor a1 (CBFA1) is a key regulator of osteoblast differentiation. This study was designed to investigate the role of CBFA1 in alveolar bone remodelling, specifically the expression of CBFA1 messenger RNA (mRNA) in human PDL cells under mechanical stress and its up- and downstream relationships with other bone remodelling markers. Cultured human PDL cells were exposed to mechanical stress. The expressions of CBFA1 and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OPN), osteoprotegrin (OPG), and receptor activator nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) were detected before and after RNA interference (RNAi) of CBFA1. The data were analysed using a t-test and one-way analysis of variance.After mechanical stress loading, CBFA1 mRNA expression was raised initially, followed by an increased expression of ALP and RANKL, decreased expression of OPG, and a change in OPN expression. After CBFA1 knock-down in human PDL cells by small hairpin (sh) RNA, the expression of ALP, OPN, OPG, and RANKL also changed. These findings suggest that in the present model system CBFA1 may play an important role in PDL-mediated bone remodelling in response to mechanical stimulation. Mechanical stress: CBFA1-ALP and OPG-PDL homeostasis may be one of the signal transduction pathways of human PDL cell differentiation under mechanical stress without exclusion of the involvement of other pathways. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154644
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.44
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.090
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCui, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorFu, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorRabie, ABen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:26:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:26:40Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Orthodontics, 2010, v. 32 n. 6, p. 698-705en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0141-5387en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154644-
dc.description.abstractMechanical stress induces human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells to express an osteoblastic phenotype in vitro. Core binding factor a1 (CBFA1) is a key regulator of osteoblast differentiation. This study was designed to investigate the role of CBFA1 in alveolar bone remodelling, specifically the expression of CBFA1 messenger RNA (mRNA) in human PDL cells under mechanical stress and its up- and downstream relationships with other bone remodelling markers. Cultured human PDL cells were exposed to mechanical stress. The expressions of CBFA1 and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OPN), osteoprotegrin (OPG), and receptor activator nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) were detected before and after RNA interference (RNAi) of CBFA1. The data were analysed using a t-test and one-way analysis of variance.After mechanical stress loading, CBFA1 mRNA expression was raised initially, followed by an increased expression of ALP and RANKL, decreased expression of OPG, and a change in OPN expression. After CBFA1 knock-down in human PDL cells by small hairpin (sh) RNA, the expression of ALP, OPN, OPG, and RANKL also changed. These findings suggest that in the present model system CBFA1 may play an important role in PDL-mediated bone remodelling in response to mechanical stimulation. Mechanical stress: CBFA1-ALP and OPG-PDL homeostasis may be one of the signal transduction pathways of human PDL cell differentiation under mechanical stress without exclusion of the involvement of other pathways. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ejo.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Orthodonticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAlkaline Phosphatase - Biosynthesis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Remodeling - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Differentiationen_US
dc.subject.meshCells, Cultureden_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshCore Binding Factor Alpha 1 Subunit - Biosynthesis - Genetics - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Stress Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Regulationen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshOsteoblastsen_US
dc.subject.meshOsteopontin - Biosynthesis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshOsteoprotegerin - Biosynthesis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Ligament - Cytology - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRank Ligand - Biosynthesis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshRna Interferenceen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Messenger - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshSignal Transductionen_US
dc.subject.meshStress, Mechanicalen_US
dc.subject.meshTooth Movementen_US
dc.titleFunctional analysis of core binding factor a1 and its relationship with related genes expressed by human periodontal ligament cells exposed to mechanical stressen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYang, Y: yangyanq@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailRabie, AB: rabie@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYang, Y=rp00045en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityRabie, AB=rp00029en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ejo/cjq010en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20525800-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649599387en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros175211-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78649599387&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume32en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage698en_HK
dc.identifier.epage705en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1460-2210-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000284638800019-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, Y=37058001100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, Y=36623085300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, X=37057684800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCui, L=37057029100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFu, M=7202031177en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRabie, AB=7007172734en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, D=36652116900en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8379521-

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