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Article: Prevalence, phenotype, and genotype of enterococcus faecalis isolated from saliva and root canals in patients with persistent apical periodontitis

TitlePrevalence, phenotype, and genotype of enterococcus faecalis isolated from saliva and root canals in patients with persistent apical periodontitis
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jendodon.com
Citation
Journal Of Endodontics, 2010, v. 36 n. 12, p. 1950-1955 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence, phenotype, and genotype of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from saliva and root canals in patients with endodontic treatment failure. Methods: Samples were collected from 32 adults undergoing retreatment for periapical lesions after endodontic treatment performed at least 2 years previously. Isolates that were presumed to be E. faecalis were identified by both API20 Strep kits and 16S rRNA sequencing. Phenotypic tests for hemolysin and gelatinase production and antibiotic susceptibility were performed. Genotype analysis comprised virulence gene detection and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results: The prevalence of E. faecalis was 18.8% in saliva and 40.6% in root canals (P = .666, Fisher exact test). Of the 19 isolates of E. faecalis, 6 were from saliva and 13 were from root canals. In 3 patients, E. faecalis isolates from saliva were more resistant to gentamicin than those from root canals. The genes ace, asa, gelE, cylA, and efaA were detected from all isolates. PFGE after SmaI digestion showed a genetic correlation among all isolates of 62%-100%. Conclusions: Phenotype and genotype evidence of potential virulence factors was identified in E. faecalis from both saliva and root canals. A single patient might carry different E. faecalis strains in saliva and root canals. © 2010 American Association of Endodontists.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154643
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.904
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.681
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC)30840091
81000428
Funding Information:

This study was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) Grant 30840091 and 81000428. We would like to thank Professors Changyun Ye, Dong fin, and Zhigang Cui from the National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, for their help with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; Professors Lihong Guo, Xiaodi Liu, and Ning Du from the Department of Oral Biology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, for their advice and help with the laboratory procedures; and Dr Trevor Lane, University of Hong Kong, for editorial assistance.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, GSPen_US
dc.contributor.authorShen, Yen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:26:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:26:40Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Endodontics, 2010, v. 36 n. 12, p. 1950-1955en_US
dc.identifier.issn0099-2399en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154643-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence, phenotype, and genotype of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from saliva and root canals in patients with endodontic treatment failure. Methods: Samples were collected from 32 adults undergoing retreatment for periapical lesions after endodontic treatment performed at least 2 years previously. Isolates that were presumed to be E. faecalis were identified by both API20 Strep kits and 16S rRNA sequencing. Phenotypic tests for hemolysin and gelatinase production and antibiotic susceptibility were performed. Genotype analysis comprised virulence gene detection and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results: The prevalence of E. faecalis was 18.8% in saliva and 40.6% in root canals (P = .666, Fisher exact test). Of the 19 isolates of E. faecalis, 6 were from saliva and 13 were from root canals. In 3 patients, E. faecalis isolates from saliva were more resistant to gentamicin than those from root canals. The genes ace, asa, gelE, cylA, and efaA were detected from all isolates. PFGE after SmaI digestion showed a genetic correlation among all isolates of 62%-100%. Conclusions: Phenotype and genotype evidence of potential virulence factors was identified in E. faecalis from both saliva and root canals. A single patient might carry different E. faecalis strains in saliva and root canals. © 2010 American Association of Endodontists.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jendodon.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Endodonticsen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshChronic Periodontitis - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Pulp Cavity - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Restoration Failureen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Microbial - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshElectrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Fielden_US
dc.subject.meshEnterococcus Faecalis - Genetics - Isolation & Purification - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshGelatinases - Biosynthesisen_US
dc.subject.meshGenes, Bacterialen_US
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshHemolysin Proteins - Biosynthesisen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriapical Periodontitis - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshRoot Canal Therapy - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshSaliva - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Failureen_US
dc.subject.meshVirulence Factors - Geneticsen_US
dc.titlePrevalence, phenotype, and genotype of enterococcus faecalis isolated from saliva and root canals in patients with persistent apical periodontitisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, C:zhangcf@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, GSP:spcheung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, C=rp01408en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, GSP=rp00016en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.joen.2010.08.053en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21092811-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78449289380en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros183650-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78449289380&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume36en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage1950en_US
dc.identifier.epage1955en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1878-3554-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285124400005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhu, X=36659978300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Q=37076402100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, C=7405494609en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, GSP=7005809531en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShen, Y=35574675000en_US

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