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Article: Complication and failure rates in patients treated for chronic periodontitis and restored with single crowns on teeth and/or implants.

TitleComplication and failure rates in patients treated for chronic periodontitis and restored with single crowns on teeth and/or implants.
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2010, v. 21 n. 5, p. 550-557 How to Cite?
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To assess the biological and technical complication rates of single crowns on vital teeth (SC-V), endodontically treated teeth without post and core (SC-E), with a cast post and core (SC-PC) and on implants (SC-I). MATERIAL AND METHODS: From 392 patients with chronic periodontitis treated and documented by graduate students during the period from 1978 to 2002, 199 were reexamined during 2005 for this retrospective cohort study, and 64 of these patients were treated with SCs. Statistical analysis included Kaplan-Meier survival functions and event rates per 100 years of object-time. Poisson regression was used to compare the four groups of crowns with respect to the incidence rate ratio of failures, and failures and complications combined over 10 years and the entire observation period. RESULTS: Forty-one (64%) female and 23 (36%) male patients participated in the reexamination. At the time of seating the crowns, the mean patient age was 46.8 (range 24-66.3) years. One hundred and sixty-eight single unit crowns were incorporated. Their mean follow-up time was 11.8 (range 0.8-26.4) years. During the time of observation, 22 biological and 11 technical complications occurred; 19 SC were lost. The chance for SC-V (56) to remain free of any failure or complication was 89.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 76.1-95.4) after 10 years, 85.8% (95% CI 66-94.5) for SC-E (34), 75.9% for SC-PC (39), (95% CI 58.8-86.7) and 66.2% (95% CI 45.1-80.7) for SC-I (39). Over 10 years, 95% of SC-I remained free of failure and demonstrated a cumulative incidence of failure or complication of 34%. Compared with SC-E, SC-I were 3.5 times more likely to yield failures or complications and SC-PC failed 1.7 times more frequently than did SC-E. SC-V had the lowest rate of failures or complications over the 10 years. CONCLUSIONS: While SCs on vital teeth have the best prognosis, those on endodontically treated teeth have a slightly poorer prognosis over 10 years. Crowns on teeth with post and cores and implant-supported SCs displayed the highest incidence of failures and complications.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154628
ISSN
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.424
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Clinical Research Foundation (CRF) for the Promotion of Oral Health, Brienz, Switzerland
Funding Information:

This study has been supported by the Clinical Research Foundation (CRF) for the Promotion of Oral Health, Brienz, Switzerland. The competent monitoring and reliable recording of data during the clinical examinations of the Dental Surgery Assistants Ms Laura Abbuhl, Ms. Isabelle Adam Salvi, Ms Tina Stalder-Ludi, Ms. Alexandra Gerber-Johl and Ms Sandra Mori-Hofmann is highly appreciated. Conflict of interest: The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest with the use of any materials used in the present study cohort or in the outcome of the study results.

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchmidlin, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorSchnell, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorSteiner, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorSalvi, GEen_US
dc.contributor.authorPjetursson, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorMatuliene, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorZwahlen, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorBrägger, Uen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:26:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:26:35Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2010, v. 21 n. 5, p. 550-557en_US
dc.identifier.issn1600-0501en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154628-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To assess the biological and technical complication rates of single crowns on vital teeth (SC-V), endodontically treated teeth without post and core (SC-E), with a cast post and core (SC-PC) and on implants (SC-I). MATERIAL AND METHODS: From 392 patients with chronic periodontitis treated and documented by graduate students during the period from 1978 to 2002, 199 were reexamined during 2005 for this retrospective cohort study, and 64 of these patients were treated with SCs. Statistical analysis included Kaplan-Meier survival functions and event rates per 100 years of object-time. Poisson regression was used to compare the four groups of crowns with respect to the incidence rate ratio of failures, and failures and complications combined over 10 years and the entire observation period. RESULTS: Forty-one (64%) female and 23 (36%) male patients participated in the reexamination. At the time of seating the crowns, the mean patient age was 46.8 (range 24-66.3) years. One hundred and sixty-eight single unit crowns were incorporated. Their mean follow-up time was 11.8 (range 0.8-26.4) years. During the time of observation, 22 biological and 11 technical complications occurred; 19 SC were lost. The chance for SC-V (56) to remain free of any failure or complication was 89.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 76.1-95.4) after 10 years, 85.8% (95% CI 66-94.5) for SC-E (34), 75.9% for SC-PC (39), (95% CI 58.8-86.7) and 66.2% (95% CI 45.1-80.7) for SC-I (39). Over 10 years, 95% of SC-I remained free of failure and demonstrated a cumulative incidence of failure or complication of 34%. Compared with SC-E, SC-I were 3.5 times more likely to yield failures or complications and SC-PC failed 1.7 times more frequently than did SC-E. SC-V had the lowest rate of failures or complications over the 10 years. CONCLUSIONS: While SCs on vital teeth have the best prognosis, those on endodontically treated teeth have a slightly poorer prognosis over 10 years. Crowns on teeth with post and cores and implant-supported SCs displayed the highest incidence of failures and complications.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical oral implants researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshChronic Diseaseen_US
dc.subject.meshCrowns - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implants - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Restoration Failureen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontitis - Radiography - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshPoisson Distributionen_US
dc.subject.meshPost And Core Technique - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titleComplication and failure rates in patients treated for chronic periodontitis and restored with single crowns on teeth and/or implants.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0501.2009.01907.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid20443806en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955502830en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros170624-
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage550en_US
dc.identifier.epage557en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000276467600013-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchmidlin, K=24476651100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchnell, N=36448602800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSteiner, S=36448714500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSalvi, GE=35600695300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPjetursson, B=6506841442en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMatuliene, G=7801433083en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZwahlen, M=7004748418en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrägger, U=7005538598en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike7068031-

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