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Article: Craniofacial profile in Southern Chinese with hypodontia

TitleCraniofacial profile in Southern Chinese with hypodontia
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ejo.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
European Journal Of Orthodontics, 2009, v. 31 n. 3, p. 300-305 How to Cite?
AbstractThe association between craniofacial morphology and congenitally missing teeth is at present unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate whether hypodontia is associated with changes in the sagittal skeletal profile and to identify putative relationships between the skeletal profile and the severity of hypodontia.In a cross-sectional analytical study, the craniofacial structure and profile based on two-dimensional lateral cephalograms of Southern Chinese hypodontia patients (n = 49, 24 males, 25 females, mean age 16.4 years) and a comparison group without hypodontia (n = 41, 15 males, 26 females, mean age 16.7 years) were compared. The hypodontia patients were divided into three subgroups according to the severity of hypodontia (mild: ≤5, moderate: 6-9, and severe: ≥10 congenitally missing permanent teeth).All hypodontia patients had a significantly reduced mandibular plane, ANB, and face height compared with the control group (P < 0.05). A significant increase in chin thickness was also observed in the hypodontia patients (P < 0.05). As the severity of hypodontia increased from moderate to severe, a tendency to develop a retrognathic maxilla and a Class III skeletal relationship was noted in addition to the above features, making the already thick chin even more prominent. Statistically significant correlations (Pearson's correlation coefficient) were found between the number of missing teeth and SNA, NAFH, and ANB angles, the mandibular plane, chin thickness, and face height.In Southern Chinese subjects, hypodontia was associated with a shorter face, a flatter mandibular plane, a more pronounced chin, and a Class III skeletal profile. In severe hypodontia subjects, the maxilla was more retrognathic with a greater predilection to a Class III skeletal relationship.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154576
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.44
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.090
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, DWSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamman, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, ASen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:26:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:26:16Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Orthodontics, 2009, v. 31 n. 3, p. 300-305en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0141-5387en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154576-
dc.description.abstractThe association between craniofacial morphology and congenitally missing teeth is at present unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate whether hypodontia is associated with changes in the sagittal skeletal profile and to identify putative relationships between the skeletal profile and the severity of hypodontia.In a cross-sectional analytical study, the craniofacial structure and profile based on two-dimensional lateral cephalograms of Southern Chinese hypodontia patients (n = 49, 24 males, 25 females, mean age 16.4 years) and a comparison group without hypodontia (n = 41, 15 males, 26 females, mean age 16.7 years) were compared. The hypodontia patients were divided into three subgroups according to the severity of hypodontia (mild: ≤5, moderate: 6-9, and severe: ≥10 congenitally missing permanent teeth).All hypodontia patients had a significantly reduced mandibular plane, ANB, and face height compared with the control group (P < 0.05). A significant increase in chin thickness was also observed in the hypodontia patients (P < 0.05). As the severity of hypodontia increased from moderate to severe, a tendency to develop a retrognathic maxilla and a Class III skeletal relationship was noted in addition to the above features, making the already thick chin even more prominent. Statistically significant correlations (Pearson's correlation coefficient) were found between the number of missing teeth and SNA, NAFH, and ANB angles, the mandibular plane, chin thickness, and face height.In Southern Chinese subjects, hypodontia was associated with a shorter face, a flatter mandibular plane, a more pronounced chin, and a Class III skeletal profile. In severe hypodontia subjects, the maxilla was more retrognathic with a greater predilection to a Class III skeletal relationship.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ejo.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Orthodonticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAnodontia - Classification - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCephalometry - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChin - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshEar, External - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFaceen_US
dc.subject.meshFacial Bones - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisted - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMalocclusion, Angle Class Iii - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMandible - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaxilla - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaxillofacial Developmenten_US
dc.subject.meshNasal Bone - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshOrbit - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSella Turcica - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSkull - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshVertical Dimensionen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleCraniofacial profile in Southern Chinese with hypodontiaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamman, N: nsamman@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcMillan, AS: annemcmillan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamman, N=rp00021en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcMillan, AS=rp00014en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ejo/cjn111en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19193707-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-68249157183en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros157532-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-68249157183&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume31en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage300en_HK
dc.identifier.epage305en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000266345500013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, DWS=35214501000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamman, N=7006413627en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcMillan, AS=7102843317en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5732766-

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