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Article: Chronic orofacial pain in southern Chinese people: experience, associated disability, and help-seeking response.

TitleChronic orofacial pain in southern Chinese people: experience, associated disability, and help-seeking response.
Authors
Issue Date2008
Citation
Journal Of Orofacial Pain, 2008, v. 22 n. 4, p. 323-330 How to Cite?
AbstractAIMS: To investigate chronic orofacial pain experience, psychosocial impact, and help-seeking response in adult Chinese people in Hong Kong. METHODS: A cross-sectional population-based telephone interview survey identified 1352 randomly selected people aged > or =18 years. Standard questions were asked about current or episodic and prior (> or = 6 months) experience of 7 orofacial pain symptoms. Pain intensity and psychosocial impact were assessed through the Graded Chronic Pain Scale, and the help-seeking response was assessed using the 4-item Level of Expressed Need (LEN) measure. RESULTS: Current or episodic symptoms of orofacial pain were reported by 57.0% of respondents, and 13.2% of this group reported symptoms that had lasted for a 6 months (chronic subgroup). In the chronic subgroup, toothache was the most common symptom (42.2%) and oral sores the least common (7.8%). The mean pain intensity in the chronic pain subgroup was 46.6 (SD 21.7) with no age or gender differences (P > .05); 88.2% had low disability levels and 11.8% had high levels. 81.4% had low LEN scores and 18.6% had high scores, with no age/gender differences (P > .05). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of current/episodic orofacial pain was relatively high, whereas chronic orofacial pain was much less common. Although the intensity of chronic orofacial pain was significant, associated psychosocial disability was low, as was the level of perceived need for treatment. These findings may be related to more effective pain-coping strategies and greater acceptance of pain in this ethnic group compared to other ethnic groups.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154560
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.824
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.599
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WSen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcmillan, ASen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, MCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:26:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:26:10Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Orofacial Pain, 2008, v. 22 n. 4, p. 323-330en_US
dc.identifier.issn1064-6655en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154560-
dc.description.abstractAIMS: To investigate chronic orofacial pain experience, psychosocial impact, and help-seeking response in adult Chinese people in Hong Kong. METHODS: A cross-sectional population-based telephone interview survey identified 1352 randomly selected people aged > or =18 years. Standard questions were asked about current or episodic and prior (> or = 6 months) experience of 7 orofacial pain symptoms. Pain intensity and psychosocial impact were assessed through the Graded Chronic Pain Scale, and the help-seeking response was assessed using the 4-item Level of Expressed Need (LEN) measure. RESULTS: Current or episodic symptoms of orofacial pain were reported by 57.0% of respondents, and 13.2% of this group reported symptoms that had lasted for a 6 months (chronic subgroup). In the chronic subgroup, toothache was the most common symptom (42.2%) and oral sores the least common (7.8%). The mean pain intensity in the chronic pain subgroup was 46.6 (SD 21.7) with no age or gender differences (P > .05); 88.2% had low disability levels and 11.8% had high levels. 81.4% had low LEN scores and 18.6% had high scores, with no age/gender differences (P > .05). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of current/episodic orofacial pain was relatively high, whereas chronic orofacial pain was much less common. Although the intensity of chronic orofacial pain was significant, associated psychosocial disability was low, as was the level of perceived need for treatment. These findings may be related to more effective pain-coping strategies and greater acceptance of pain in this ethnic group compared to other ethnic groups.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of orofacial painen_US
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distributionen_US
dc.subject.meshChronic Diseaseen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFacial Pain - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Needs And Demanden_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPain Measurementen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Acceptance Of Health Careen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshSickness Impact Profileen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Classen_US
dc.subject.meshToothache - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleChronic orofacial pain in southern Chinese people: experience, associated disability, and help-seeking response.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMcMillan, AS:annemcmillan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, MC:mcmwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcMillan, AS=rp00014en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, MC=rp00024en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid19090405-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-59049093044en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros153766-
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage323en_US
dc.identifier.epage330en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263243700006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, WS=7201504547en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcMillan, AS=7102843317en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, MC=26029250900en_US

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