File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Oral candidosis in HIV-infected patients

TitleOral candidosis in HIV-infected patients
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherBentham Science Publishers Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bentham.org/chivr/index.htm
Citation
Current Hiv Research, 2008, v. 6 n. 6, p. 485-499 How to Cite?
AbstractOral candidosis (syn. Oral candidiasis; OC), is a collective term given to a group of oral mucosal disorders caused by the fugal pathogen belonging to the genus Candida. The association of OC with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been known since the advent of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic. OC is one of the earliest manifestations of HIV disease in high risk individuals not undergoing chemotherapy and is also a strong predictor of the subsequent risk of AIDS-related illness or death. With the advances in HIV therapy, such as highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), the prevalence and presenting features of OC have changed in HIV-infected individuals, especially those in industrialized countries. The presence of OC in "controlled" HIV-positive individuals may be indicative of a patient nonadherence to therapy or possible failure. The factors contributing to the genesis of OC and its progression in these individuals are poorly understood, but may include an interrelationship between HIV and Candida and/or a dysfunction in the local immunity, superimposed on weakened cell-mediated immunity and depletion of CD4 T cells. The dramatic increase in publications on this topic matches the increased importance and awareness of this opportunistic infection in HIV-infected individuals. In this review we first address the epidemiologic and clinical features of OC in HIV-infected persons, followed by the current understanding of the pathogenesis of OC in the context of HIV infection with a concluding section on the current management concepts of OC. © 2008 Betham Science Publishers Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154557
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.562
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.979
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEgusa, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorSoysa, NSen_US
dc.contributor.authorEllepola, ANen_US
dc.contributor.authorYatani, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:26:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:26:09Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Hiv Research, 2008, v. 6 n. 6, p. 485-499en_US
dc.identifier.issn1570-162Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154557-
dc.description.abstractOral candidosis (syn. Oral candidiasis; OC), is a collective term given to a group of oral mucosal disorders caused by the fugal pathogen belonging to the genus Candida. The association of OC with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been known since the advent of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic. OC is one of the earliest manifestations of HIV disease in high risk individuals not undergoing chemotherapy and is also a strong predictor of the subsequent risk of AIDS-related illness or death. With the advances in HIV therapy, such as highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), the prevalence and presenting features of OC have changed in HIV-infected individuals, especially those in industrialized countries. The presence of OC in "controlled" HIV-positive individuals may be indicative of a patient nonadherence to therapy or possible failure. The factors contributing to the genesis of OC and its progression in these individuals are poorly understood, but may include an interrelationship between HIV and Candida and/or a dysfunction in the local immunity, superimposed on weakened cell-mediated immunity and depletion of CD4 T cells. The dramatic increase in publications on this topic matches the increased importance and awareness of this opportunistic infection in HIV-infected individuals. In this review we first address the epidemiologic and clinical features of OC in HIV-infected persons, followed by the current understanding of the pathogenesis of OC in the context of HIV infection with a concluding section on the current management concepts of OC. © 2008 Betham Science Publishers Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBentham Science Publishers Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bentham.org/chivr/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent HIV Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshCandidiasis, Oral - Drug Therapy - Epidemiology - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDeveloped Countriesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHiv Infections - Complications - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.titleOral candidosis in HIV-infected patientsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2174/157016208786501445en_US
dc.identifier.pmid18991614-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-58149234315en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-58149234315&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume6en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage485en_US
dc.identifier.epage499en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000261501100001-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEgusa, H=6602170721en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSoysa, NS=9735945000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEllepola, AN=6604060863en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYatani, H=7004428080en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike3655792-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats