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Article: Severe acute respiratory syndrome and dentistry: A retrospective view

TitleSevere acute respiratory syndrome and dentistry: A retrospective view
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherAmerican Dental Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://jada.ada.org
Citation
Journal Of The American Dental Association, 2004, v. 135 n. 9, p. 1292-1302 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS, which has created panic in Asia and in some parts of North America, is the first epidemic of the new century. Although it has been well-contained, sporadic cases continue to emerge. Objectives. The authors trace the emergence of the SARS outbreak from southern China and its spread worldwide, discuss the viral etiology of the infection and its clinical features, and review the infection control guidelines issued during the outbreak by the health authorities in Hong Kong, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization and the American Dental Association. They also review the prospects for a new outbreak and preventive measures. Overview. The disease, which is caused by a novel coronavirus termed the "SARS coronavirus," or SARS-CoV, essentially spreads through droplet infection and affects people of any age. It has a mortality rate ranging from 10 to 15 percent. A major hallmark of this disease has been the rate at which it has affected health care workers through nosocomial transmission; in some countries, up to one-fourth to one-third of those infected were in this category. However, no dental health care worker has been affected by SARS in a nosocomial or dental setting. Conclusions and Clinical Implications. Researchers believe that a combination of factors, including the universal infection control measures that the dental community has implemented and/or the low degree of viral shedding in the prodromal phase of SARS, may have obviated the spread of the disease in dental settings. The dental community should reflect on this outbreak to reinforce the currently applied infection control measures.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154539
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.767
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.661
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:26:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:26:03Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The American Dental Association, 2004, v. 135 n. 9, p. 1292-1302en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-8177en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154539-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS, which has created panic in Asia and in some parts of North America, is the first epidemic of the new century. Although it has been well-contained, sporadic cases continue to emerge. Objectives. The authors trace the emergence of the SARS outbreak from southern China and its spread worldwide, discuss the viral etiology of the infection and its clinical features, and review the infection control guidelines issued during the outbreak by the health authorities in Hong Kong, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization and the American Dental Association. They also review the prospects for a new outbreak and preventive measures. Overview. The disease, which is caused by a novel coronavirus termed the "SARS coronavirus," or SARS-CoV, essentially spreads through droplet infection and affects people of any age. It has a mortality rate ranging from 10 to 15 percent. A major hallmark of this disease has been the rate at which it has affected health care workers through nosocomial transmission; in some countries, up to one-fourth to one-third of those infected were in this category. However, no dental health care worker has been affected by SARS in a nosocomial or dental setting. Conclusions and Clinical Implications. Researchers believe that a combination of factors, including the universal infection control measures that the dental community has implemented and/or the low degree of viral shedding in the prodromal phase of SARS, may have obviated the spread of the disease in dental settings. The dental community should reflect on this outbreak to reinforce the currently applied infection control measures.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Dental Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://jada.ada.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Dental Associationen_US
dc.subject.meshCenters For Disease Control And Prevention (U.S.)en_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshCross Infection - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfection Control, Dental - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshInfectious Disease Transmission, Patient-To-Professional - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshSars Virus - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Prevention & Control - Transmissionen_US
dc.subject.meshUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.meshWorld Health Organizationen_US
dc.titleSevere acute respiratory syndrome and dentistry: A retrospective viewen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, M:malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, M=rp00410en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid15493394-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4944241478en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros94646-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-4944241478&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume135en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage1292en_US
dc.identifier.epage1302en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000223927300023-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, M=7005486823en_US

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