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Article: Impact of IL-1 genotype and smoking status on the prognosis of osseointegrated implants

TitleImpact of IL-1 genotype and smoking status on the prognosis of osseointegrated implants
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2004, v. 15 n. 4, p. 393-400 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: This study evaluated the impact of the IL-1 genotype and smoking status on the prognosis and development of complications of osseointegrated implants. Material and methods: The clinical charts of 180 consecutively admitted patients were analyzed with respect to the occurrence of biological complications in conjunction with oral implants. Biologic complications were defined as clinical conditions with suppuration from the peri-implant sulcus, development of a fistula or peri-implantitis with radiologic bone loss. All patients had received one or more ITI® dental implants, which had been in function for at least 8 (range: 8-15) years. This patient population had received 292 implants. From these, 51 implants in 34 patients showed late (infectious) biologic complications, and 241 implants had survived without any biologic complications at all. Results: Of the 180 patients, 53 were smokers, who were subdivided in a series of classes according to their intensity of smoking and 127 were never smokers. Sixty-four of 180 (36%) patients tested positive for the IL-1 genotype polymorphism. This prevalence corresponds to previous reports for the prevalence of European descent populations. The results for the non-smoking group indicated no significant correlation between implant complications and a positive IL-1 genotype. However, there was a clear association for heavy smokers between a positive IL-1 genotype and implant complications. 6 of 12 or half of the heavy smokers and IL-1 genotype-positive patients had either an implant failure, i.e. loss of implant, or a biologic complication during the follow-up period. Conclusions: These findings have led to the conclusion that there is a synergistic effect between a positive IL-1 genotype and smoking that puts dental implants at a significantly higher risk of developing biologic complications during function.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154532
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.464
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.427
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGruica, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, HYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.contributor.authorBuser, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:26:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:26:01Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2004, v. 15 n. 4, p. 393-400en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154532-
dc.description.abstractAim: This study evaluated the impact of the IL-1 genotype and smoking status on the prognosis and development of complications of osseointegrated implants. Material and methods: The clinical charts of 180 consecutively admitted patients were analyzed with respect to the occurrence of biological complications in conjunction with oral implants. Biologic complications were defined as clinical conditions with suppuration from the peri-implant sulcus, development of a fistula or peri-implantitis with radiologic bone loss. All patients had received one or more ITI® dental implants, which had been in function for at least 8 (range: 8-15) years. This patient population had received 292 implants. From these, 51 implants in 34 patients showed late (infectious) biologic complications, and 241 implants had survived without any biologic complications at all. Results: Of the 180 patients, 53 were smokers, who were subdivided in a series of classes according to their intensity of smoking and 127 were never smokers. Sixty-four of 180 (36%) patients tested positive for the IL-1 genotype polymorphism. This prevalence corresponds to previous reports for the prevalence of European descent populations. The results for the non-smoking group indicated no significant correlation between implant complications and a positive IL-1 genotype. However, there was a clear association for heavy smokers between a positive IL-1 genotype and implant complications. 6 of 12 or half of the heavy smokers and IL-1 genotype-positive patients had either an implant failure, i.e. loss of implant, or a biologic complication during the follow-up period. Conclusions: These findings have led to the conclusion that there is a synergistic effect between a positive IL-1 genotype and smoking that puts dental implants at a significantly higher risk of developing biologic complications during function.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshAlveolar Bone Loss - Etiology - Genetics - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Fistula - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implantation, Endosseous - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implants - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Restoration Failureen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInterleukin-1 - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOsseointegration - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontitis - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_US
dc.subject.meshSmoking - Adverse Effects - Geneticsen_US
dc.titleImpact of IL-1 genotype and smoking status on the prognosis of osseointegrated implantsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0501.2004.01026.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid15248873-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4644306146en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-4644306146&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage393en_US
dc.identifier.epage400en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000222578900002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGruica, B=7801346178en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, HY=7501730695en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBuser, D=7006034952en_US

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