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Article: The development of a novel automated taste stimulus delivery system for fMRI studies on the human cortical segregation of taste

TitleThe development of a novel automated taste stimulus delivery system for fMRI studies on the human cortical segregation of taste
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jneumeth
Citation
Journal Of Neuroscience Methods, 2008, v. 172 n. 1, p. 48-53 How to Cite?
Abstract
fMRI indicated that the primary taste cortex is activated not only by taste but also by non-taste information from oral stimuli. Head movements caused by swallowing are very critical problem in fMRI and inherent difficulties to modulate taste stimuli in the mouth exist to elucidate functional segregation of human brain. We developed a novel automated taste stimulus delivery system for fMRI studies to segregate the pure taste area in the primary taste cortex in humans. As a novel intra-oral device, an elliptic cylinder was attached to an individual mouthpiece and then subject placed the tongue tip in it. Using a computer-controlled extra-oral device, the solutions ran through the intra-oral device in constant conditions. Three adult volunteers participated in the experimental session, alternately consisting of 30 pairs of taste stimuli (0.5 mol/l sucrose solution) and control (water) blocks. The typical findings of the three subjects revealed activation only in the primary taste cortex (P < 0.001), and none in the secondary taste cortex. This is the first system that delivers the taste stimuli automatically to a standardized area on the subject's tongue under constant conditions, thus allowing us to successfully segregate the pure taste area in the primary taste cortex in humans. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154521
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 1.959
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.208
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. Kyushu University
  2. Kyushu University Hospital
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKami, YNen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoto, TKen_US
dc.contributor.authorTokumori, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorYoshiura, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorKobayashi, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorNakamura, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorHonda, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorNinomiya, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorYoshiura, Ken_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:25:57Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:25:57Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Neuroscience Methods, 2008, v. 172 n. 1, p. 48-53en_US
dc.identifier.issn0165-0270en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154521-
dc.description.abstractfMRI indicated that the primary taste cortex is activated not only by taste but also by non-taste information from oral stimuli. Head movements caused by swallowing are very critical problem in fMRI and inherent difficulties to modulate taste stimuli in the mouth exist to elucidate functional segregation of human brain. We developed a novel automated taste stimulus delivery system for fMRI studies to segregate the pure taste area in the primary taste cortex in humans. As a novel intra-oral device, an elliptic cylinder was attached to an individual mouthpiece and then subject placed the tongue tip in it. Using a computer-controlled extra-oral device, the solutions ran through the intra-oral device in constant conditions. Three adult volunteers participated in the experimental session, alternately consisting of 30 pairs of taste stimuli (0.5 mol/l sucrose solution) and control (water) blocks. The typical findings of the three subjects revealed activation only in the primary taste cortex (P < 0.001), and none in the secondary taste cortex. This is the first system that delivers the taste stimuli automatically to a standardized area on the subject's tongue under constant conditions, thus allowing us to successfully segregate the pure taste area in the primary taste cortex in humans. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jneumethen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Neuroscience Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshAdministration, Oralen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Mappingen_US
dc.subject.meshCerebral Cortex - Blood Supply - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Delivery Systems - Instrumentation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFlavoring Agents - Administration & Dosageen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisted - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshOxygen - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshSucrose - Administration & Dosageen_US
dc.subject.meshTaste - Drug Effects - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleThe development of a novel automated taste stimulus delivery system for fMRI studies on the human cortical segregation of tasteen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGoto, TK:gototk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGoto, TK=rp01434en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jneumeth.2008.04.009en_US
dc.identifier.pmid18511125en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-44449151475en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-44449151475&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume172en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage48en_US
dc.identifier.epage53en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1872-678X-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257485800009-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKami, YN=24329616700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGoto, TK=7403938313en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTokumori, K=6603353660en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYoshiura, T=7003641296en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKobayashi, K=24076495200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNakamura, Y=7406387857en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHonda, H=36012722500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNinomiya, Y=7201658663en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYoshiura, K=7006527913en_US

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