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Article: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and the GDP. Part I: Epidemiology, virology, pathology and general health issues

TitleSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and the GDP. Part I: Epidemiology, virology, pathology and general health issues
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bdj.co.uk
Citation
British Dental Journal, 2004, v. 197 n. 2, p. 77-80 How to Cite?
AbstractThe health profession faces a new challenge with the emergence of a novel viral disease Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), a form of atypical pneumonia caused by a coronavirus termed SARS-CoV. This highly infectious disease has spread through 32 countries, infecting more than 8,400 patients with over 790 deaths in just over 6 months. Over one quarter of those infected were unsuspecting healthcare workers. The major transmission mode of SARS-coronavirus appears to be through droplet spread with other minor subsidiary modes of transmission such as close contact and fomites although air borne transmission has not been ruled out. There is as yet no definitive treatment protocol. Although the peak period of the outbreak is likely to have passed and the risk of SARS in the UK is therefore assessed to be low, the World Health Organisation has asked all countries to remain vigilant lest SARS re-emerges. Recent laboratory acquired cases of SARS reported from Taiwan and Beijing, China are a testimony to this risk. Until reliable diagnostic tests, vaccine and medications are available, control of SARS outbreaks depends on close surveillance, early identification of index cases, quick isolation of carriers and effective infection control and public health measures.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154510
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.997
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.461
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, RWKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KWCen_US
dc.contributor.authorSun, FCSen_US
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:25:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:25:52Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Dental Journal, 2004, v. 197 n. 2, p. 77-80en_US
dc.identifier.issn0007-0610en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154510-
dc.description.abstractThe health profession faces a new challenge with the emergence of a novel viral disease Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), a form of atypical pneumonia caused by a coronavirus termed SARS-CoV. This highly infectious disease has spread through 32 countries, infecting more than 8,400 patients with over 790 deaths in just over 6 months. Over one quarter of those infected were unsuspecting healthcare workers. The major transmission mode of SARS-coronavirus appears to be through droplet spread with other minor subsidiary modes of transmission such as close contact and fomites although air borne transmission has not been ruled out. There is as yet no definitive treatment protocol. Although the peak period of the outbreak is likely to have passed and the risk of SARS in the UK is therefore assessed to be low, the World Health Organisation has asked all countries to remain vigilant lest SARS re-emerges. Recent laboratory acquired cases of SARS reported from Taiwan and Beijing, China are a testimony to this risk. Until reliable diagnostic tests, vaccine and medications are available, control of SARS outbreaks depends on close surveillance, early identification of index cases, quick isolation of carriers and effective infection control and public health measures.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bdj.co.uken_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Dental Journalen_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaksen_US
dc.subject.meshGeneral Practice, Dentalen_US
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfection Control, Dental - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshInfectious Disease Transmission, Patient-To-Professional - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshSars Virusen_US
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Epidemiology - Pathology - Transmission - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTaiwan - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshUniversal Precautionsen_US
dc.titleSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and the GDP. Part I: Epidemiology, virology, pathology and general health issuesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.bdj.4811469en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15272339-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4143059083en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros89287-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-4143059083&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume197en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage77en_US
dc.identifier.epage80en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000222851400018-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, RWK=7404724120en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, KWC=7401860472en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, FCS=7401804224en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_US

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