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Article: Characteristics of dual species Candida biofilms on denture acrylic surfaces

TitleCharacteristics of dual species Candida biofilms on denture acrylic surfaces
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/archoralbio
Citation
Archives Of Oral Biology, 2007, v. 52 n. 12, p. 1200-1208 How to Cite?
AbstractBiofilms contribute to the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis, some 15% of which may be due to dual Candida species. Despite extensive studies on monospecies biofilms (MSB) on denture acrylic surfaces, few have investigated the characteristics of dual species Candida biofilms (DSB). Objectives: To examine interactions of DSB of Candida albicans and Candida krusei on denture acrylic surfaces. Methods: Two isolates each of C. albicans (Ca) and C. krusei (Ck), with high (Cah, Ckh) and low (Cal, Ckl) biofilm-forming ability were used. The biofilms were developed on acrylic surfaces aerobically at 37 °C in yeast nitrogen base (YNB) medium, and growth quantified by colony-forming unit (CFU) assay. We determined: (i) the population profiles of DSB comprising each pair of Candida species, of a total of four combination pairs, after 12 h, (ii) the effect of a constant concentration of Cah (107 cells/ml) on varying concentrations of Ckh (103-107 cells/ml) on DSB development and (iii) the effect of saliva on the growth of DSB. Results: (i) DSB exhibited a lower cell population after 9 or 12 h in comparison to MSB (P < 0.05), (ii) C. albicans (107 cells/ml) co-cultured with varying initial concentrations of C. krusei was inhibited at high concentrations of the latter (106-107 cells/ml) (P < 0.05) and (iii) only the MSB development of C. krusei was affected by saliva (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Our data suggest that the competitive interactions of fungal species are likely to be important in biofilm formation on acrylic surfaces and human saliva may further modulate this process. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154493
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.733
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.713
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThein, ZMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, YHen_US
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:25:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:25:38Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Oral Biology, 2007, v. 52 n. 12, p. 1200-1208en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-9969en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154493-
dc.description.abstractBiofilms contribute to the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis, some 15% of which may be due to dual Candida species. Despite extensive studies on monospecies biofilms (MSB) on denture acrylic surfaces, few have investigated the characteristics of dual species Candida biofilms (DSB). Objectives: To examine interactions of DSB of Candida albicans and Candida krusei on denture acrylic surfaces. Methods: Two isolates each of C. albicans (Ca) and C. krusei (Ck), with high (Cah, Ckh) and low (Cal, Ckl) biofilm-forming ability were used. The biofilms were developed on acrylic surfaces aerobically at 37 °C in yeast nitrogen base (YNB) medium, and growth quantified by colony-forming unit (CFU) assay. We determined: (i) the population profiles of DSB comprising each pair of Candida species, of a total of four combination pairs, after 12 h, (ii) the effect of a constant concentration of Cah (107 cells/ml) on varying concentrations of Ckh (103-107 cells/ml) on DSB development and (iii) the effect of saliva on the growth of DSB. Results: (i) DSB exhibited a lower cell population after 9 or 12 h in comparison to MSB (P < 0.05), (ii) C. albicans (107 cells/ml) co-cultured with varying initial concentrations of C. krusei was inhibited at high concentrations of the latter (106-107 cells/ml) (P < 0.05) and (iii) only the MSB development of C. krusei was affected by saliva (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Our data suggest that the competitive interactions of fungal species are likely to be important in biofilm formation on acrylic surfaces and human saliva may further modulate this process. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/archoralbioen_US
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Oral Biologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAcrylic Resinsen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBiofilms - Growth & Developmenten_US
dc.subject.meshCandida - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCandidiasis, Oral - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshColony Count, Microbialen_US
dc.subject.meshDenture Bases - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Scanningen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshSaliva - Microbiologyen_US
dc.titleCharacteristics of dual species Candida biofilms on denture acrylic surfacesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, YH:hema@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, YH=rp00025en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.archoralbio.2007.06.007en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17681271-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35549003575en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-35549003575&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume52en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage1200en_US
dc.identifier.epage1208en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000251356000011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThein, ZM=14049367300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, YH=6602677237en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_US

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