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Article: Effect of operating air pressure on tribochemical silica-coating

TitleEffect of operating air pressure on tribochemical silica-coating
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00016357.asp
Citation
Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, 2007, v. 65 n. 4, p. 241-248 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. Alumina and zirconia are inert to conventional etching and need to be initially conditioned with, for example, silicatization. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of operating air pressure of tribochemical silica-coating method on the shear bond strength of composite resin to ceramic substrates. Material and methods. Alumina (Procera Alumina, Nobel Biocare) and zirconia (LAVA; 3M ESPE and Procera Zirconia; Nobel Biocare) were airborne particle silica-coated (CoJet; 3M ESPE) using selected, clinically available air pressures of 150, 220, 300, and 450 kPa. The surfaces were silanized with silane coupling agent (ESPE Sil; 3M ESPE) and coated with adhesive resin (3M Multipurpose resin; 3M ESPE). Particulate filler resin composite (Z250; 3M ESPE) stubs (diameter 3.6 mm, height 4.0 mm) were added onto ceramics and light-cured for 40 s. The test specimens (n=18/group) were thermocycled (6000 x 5-55°C) and shear bond strengths were measured with a cross-head speed of 1.0 mm/min. Fracture surfaces were examined with SEM, and an elemental analysis (EDS) was carried out to determine silica content on the substrate surface. Results. The highest bond strengths were obtained with the highest pressures. ANOVA showed significant differences in bond strength between the ceramics (p<0.05) and between the specimens treated at various air pressures (p<0.05). Conclusions. Clinically, the operating air pressure of silicatization may have a significant effect on bond strength to non-etchable ceramics. © 2007 Taylor & Francis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154484
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.171
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.455
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHeikkinen, TTen_US
dc.contributor.authorLassila, LVJen_US
dc.contributor.authorMatinlinna, JPen_US
dc.contributor.authorVallittu, PKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:25:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:25:34Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationActa Odontologica Scandinavica, 2007, v. 65 n. 4, p. 241-248en_US
dc.identifier.issn0001-6357en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154484-
dc.description.abstractObjective. Alumina and zirconia are inert to conventional etching and need to be initially conditioned with, for example, silicatization. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of operating air pressure of tribochemical silica-coating method on the shear bond strength of composite resin to ceramic substrates. Material and methods. Alumina (Procera Alumina, Nobel Biocare) and zirconia (LAVA; 3M ESPE and Procera Zirconia; Nobel Biocare) were airborne particle silica-coated (CoJet; 3M ESPE) using selected, clinically available air pressures of 150, 220, 300, and 450 kPa. The surfaces were silanized with silane coupling agent (ESPE Sil; 3M ESPE) and coated with adhesive resin (3M Multipurpose resin; 3M ESPE). Particulate filler resin composite (Z250; 3M ESPE) stubs (diameter 3.6 mm, height 4.0 mm) were added onto ceramics and light-cured for 40 s. The test specimens (n=18/group) were thermocycled (6000 x 5-55°C) and shear bond strengths were measured with a cross-head speed of 1.0 mm/min. Fracture surfaces were examined with SEM, and an elemental analysis (EDS) was carried out to determine silica content on the substrate surface. Results. The highest bond strengths were obtained with the highest pressures. ANOVA showed significant differences in bond strength between the ceramics (p<0.05) and between the specimens treated at various air pressures (p<0.05). Conclusions. Clinically, the operating air pressure of silicatization may have a significant effect on bond strength to non-etchable ceramics. © 2007 Taylor & Francis.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00016357.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofActa Odontologica Scandinavicaen_US
dc.subject.meshAcrylic Resins - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshAir Pressureen_US
dc.subject.meshAluminum Oxide - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshComposite Resins - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshPolyurethanes - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshShear Strengthen_US
dc.subject.meshSilanes - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshSilicon Dioxide - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshSurface Propertiesen_US
dc.subject.meshZirconium - Chemistryen_US
dc.titleEffect of operating air pressure on tribochemical silica-coatingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMatinlinna, JP:jpmat@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMatinlinna, JP=rp00052en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00016350701459753en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17762988-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34548317594en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34548317594&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume65en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage241en_US
dc.identifier.epage248en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000249180800010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHeikkinen, TT=14053957600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLassila, LVJ=6603761779en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMatinlinna, JP=6602419428en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVallittu, PK=7006138548en_US

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