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Article: What are the longevities of teeth and oral implants?

TitleWhat are the longevities of teeth and oral implants?
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2007, v. 18 SUPPL. 3, p. 15-19 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To analyse tooth loss and to evaluate the longevity of healthy teeth and teeth compromised by diseases and influenced by therapy as well as that of oral implants. Material and methods: On the basis of an electronic and manual search using key words for survival, success, longevity of teeth, longevity of implants, epidemiology, periodontally compromised, endodontically compromised, risk for tooth extraction 49 full-text articles were identified to construct a traditional review. Among these, six systematic reviews addressing longevity were found. Results: Tooth loss is a complex outcome, it is influenced by the extent of dental caries and its sequelae and/or the presence or absence of periodontitis as well as the decisions taken by dentists when evaluating possible risk factors for rendering successful therapy. In addition, tooth loss is related to behavioural and socio-economic factors and associated morbidity and cultural priorities. Generally, teeth surrounded by healthy periodontal tissues yield a very high longevity (up to 99.5% over 50 years). If periodontally compromised, but treated and maintained regularly, the survival of such teeth is still very high (92-93%). Likewise, endodontically compromised, but successfully treated devital teeth yield high survival and success rates. The survival of oral implants after 10 years varies between 82% and 94%. Conclusions: Teeth will last for life, unless they are affected by oral diseases or service interventions. Many retained teeth thus may be an indicator of positive oral health behaviour throughout the life course. Tooth longevity is largely dependent on the health status of the periodontium, the pulp or periapical region and the extent of reconstructions. Multiple risks lead to a critical appraisal of the value of a tooth. Oral implants when evaluated after 10 years of service do not surpass the longevity of even compromised but successfully treated natural teeth. © 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154466
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.464
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.427
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHolmPedersen, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.contributor.authorMüller, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:25:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:25:28Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2007, v. 18 SUPPL. 3, p. 15-19en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154466-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To analyse tooth loss and to evaluate the longevity of healthy teeth and teeth compromised by diseases and influenced by therapy as well as that of oral implants. Material and methods: On the basis of an electronic and manual search using key words for survival, success, longevity of teeth, longevity of implants, epidemiology, periodontally compromised, endodontically compromised, risk for tooth extraction 49 full-text articles were identified to construct a traditional review. Among these, six systematic reviews addressing longevity were found. Results: Tooth loss is a complex outcome, it is influenced by the extent of dental caries and its sequelae and/or the presence or absence of periodontitis as well as the decisions taken by dentists when evaluating possible risk factors for rendering successful therapy. In addition, tooth loss is related to behavioural and socio-economic factors and associated morbidity and cultural priorities. Generally, teeth surrounded by healthy periodontal tissues yield a very high longevity (up to 99.5% over 50 years). If periodontally compromised, but treated and maintained regularly, the survival of such teeth is still very high (92-93%). Likewise, endodontically compromised, but successfully treated devital teeth yield high survival and success rates. The survival of oral implants after 10 years varies between 82% and 94%. Conclusions: Teeth will last for life, unless they are affected by oral diseases or service interventions. Many retained teeth thus may be an indicator of positive oral health behaviour throughout the life course. Tooth longevity is largely dependent on the health status of the periodontium, the pulp or periapical region and the extent of reconstructions. Multiple risks lead to a critical appraisal of the value of a tooth. Oral implants when evaluated after 10 years of service do not surpass the longevity of even compromised but successfully treated natural teeth. © 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Cariesen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implantsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Diseases - Complications - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshProsthesis Failureen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTooth - Pathology - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTooth Loss - Epidemiology - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.titleWhat are the longevities of teeth and oral implants?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0501.2007.01434.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid17594366-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34250672374en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34250672374&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issueSUPPL. 3en_US
dc.identifier.spage15en_US
dc.identifier.epage19en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000247914600003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHolmPedersen, P=6701530761en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMüller, F=9133808100en_US

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