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Article: Microbiological composition associated with interleukin-1 gene polymorphism in subjects undergoingsupportive periodontal therapy

TitleMicrobiological composition associated with interleukin-1 gene polymorphism in subjects undergoingsupportive periodontal therapy
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherAmerican Academy of Periodontology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perio.org
Citation
Journal Of Periodontology, 2006, v. 77 n. 8, p. 1397-1402 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Interleukin-1 gene polymorphism (IL-1 gene) has been associated with periodontitis. The present study examined the subgingival microbiota by IL-1 gene status in subjects undergoing supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). Methods: A total of 151 subjects with known IL-1 gene status (IL-1A +4845/IL-1B -3954) (IL-1 gene) were included in this study. Clinical data and subgingival plaque samples (40 taxa) were collected. These taxa were determined by the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method. Results: Gender, smoking habits (n-par tests), age, and clinical periodontal conditions did not differ by IL-1 gene status. IL-1 gene-negative subjects had a higher total bacterial load (mean difference, 480.4 × 105; 95% confidence interval [CI], 77 to 884 × 105; P <0.02). The levels of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (mean difference, 30.7 × 105; 95% CI, 2.2 to 59.5 × 105; P <0.05), Eubacterium nodatum (mean difference, 4.2 × 105; 95% CI, 0.6 to 7.8 × 105; p <0.02), Porphyromonas gingivalis (mean difference, 17.9 × 105; 95% CI, 1.2 to 34.5 × 105; P <0.05), and Streptococcus anginosus (mean difference, 4.0 × 105; 95% CI, 0.2 to 7.2 × 105; P <0.05) were higher in IL-1 gene-negative subjects, an observation specifically found at sites with probing depths <5.0 mm. Conclusions: Bleeding on probing did not differ by IL gene status, reflecting clinical SPT efficacy. IL-1 gene-negative subjects had higher levels of periodontal pathogens. This may suggest that among subjects undergoing SPT, a lower bacterial load is required in IL-1 gene-positive subjects to develop the same level of periodontitis as in IL-1 gene-negative subjects.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154424
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.844
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.070
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAgerbaek, MRen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.contributor.authorPersson, GRen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:25:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:25:15Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Periodontology, 2006, v. 77 n. 8, p. 1397-1402en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3492en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154424-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Interleukin-1 gene polymorphism (IL-1 gene) has been associated with periodontitis. The present study examined the subgingival microbiota by IL-1 gene status in subjects undergoing supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). Methods: A total of 151 subjects with known IL-1 gene status (IL-1A +4845/IL-1B -3954) (IL-1 gene) were included in this study. Clinical data and subgingival plaque samples (40 taxa) were collected. These taxa were determined by the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method. Results: Gender, smoking habits (n-par tests), age, and clinical periodontal conditions did not differ by IL-1 gene status. IL-1 gene-negative subjects had a higher total bacterial load (mean difference, 480.4 × 105; 95% confidence interval [CI], 77 to 884 × 105; P <0.02). The levels of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (mean difference, 30.7 × 105; 95% CI, 2.2 to 59.5 × 105; P <0.05), Eubacterium nodatum (mean difference, 4.2 × 105; 95% CI, 0.6 to 7.8 × 105; p <0.02), Porphyromonas gingivalis (mean difference, 17.9 × 105; 95% CI, 1.2 to 34.5 × 105; P <0.05), and Streptococcus anginosus (mean difference, 4.0 × 105; 95% CI, 0.2 to 7.2 × 105; P <0.05) were higher in IL-1 gene-negative subjects, an observation specifically found at sites with probing depths <5.0 mm. Conclusions: Bleeding on probing did not differ by IL gene status, reflecting clinical SPT efficacy. IL-1 gene-negative subjects had higher levels of periodontal pathogens. This may suggest that among subjects undergoing SPT, a lower bacterial load is required in IL-1 gene-positive subjects to develop the same level of periodontitis as in IL-1 gene-negative subjects.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Academy of Periodontology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perio.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Periodontologyen_US
dc.subject.meshActinobacillus Actinomycetemcomitans - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshColony Count, Microbialen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Plaque - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Prophylaxisen_US
dc.subject.meshEubacterium - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInterleukin-1 - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontitis - Genetics - Microbiology - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshPorphyromonas Gingivalis - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshSmokingen_US
dc.subject.meshStreptococcus Anginosus - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.titleMicrobiological composition associated with interleukin-1 gene polymorphism in subjects undergoingsupportive periodontal therapyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1902/jop.2006.050212en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16881809-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748577364en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33748577364&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume77en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage1397en_US
dc.identifier.epage1402en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000241879300014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAgerbaek, MR=12787694200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPersson, GR=7101853867en_US

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