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Article: Quality and quantity of bone following alveolar distraction osteogenesis in the human mandible

TitleQuality and quantity of bone following alveolar distraction osteogenesis in the human mandible
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2006, v. 17 n. 4, p. 394-402 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: The purpose of this prospective study on humans were to evaluate (a) the clinical outcome of alveolar distraction osteogenesis for the correction of vertically deficient edentulous mandibular ridges, (b) the clinical outcome of dental implants placed in the distracted areas, and (c) the quality and quantity of the bone that had formed in the distraction gap. Material and methods: Seven patients presenting vertically deficient edentulous ridges were treated by means of distraction osteogenesis with an intraoral alveolar distractor. Approximately 3 months after consolidation of the distracted segments, 20 ITI solid screw SLA implants were placed in the distracted areas. Three to 4 months later, abutments were connected and prosthetic loading of the implants started. During implant site preparation, bone biopsies were taken at the implant sites with trephine burrs for histologic and histometric analyses. Results: The mean follow-up after the initial prosthetic loading was 18 months (range 12-24 months). The mean bone gain obtained at the end of distraction was 7 mm (range 5-9 mm). The cumulative success rate of implants 2 years after the onset of prosthetic loading was 95%, whereas the survival rate of implants was 100%. The newly formed bone consisted of woven bone reinforced by parallel-fibered bone with bone marrow spaces between the bone trabeculae. The bone area fraction in the distraction region ranged from 21.6% to 57.8% (38.5 ± 11.7%). Discussion and conclusions: Results from this study showed that (a) distraction osteogenesis is a reliable technique for the correction of vertically deficient edentulous ridges, (b) the regenerated bone withstood the functional demands of implant loading, (c) survival and success rates of implants placed in the distracted areas were consistent with those of implants placed in native bone, and (d) there is sufficient bone volume and maturity in the distracted region for primary stability of the implant. Copyright © Blackwell Munksgaard 2006.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154412
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.464
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.427
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChiapasco, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.contributor.authorBosshardt, DDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:25:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:25:10Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2006, v. 17 n. 4, p. 394-402en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154412-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this prospective study on humans were to evaluate (a) the clinical outcome of alveolar distraction osteogenesis for the correction of vertically deficient edentulous mandibular ridges, (b) the clinical outcome of dental implants placed in the distracted areas, and (c) the quality and quantity of the bone that had formed in the distraction gap. Material and methods: Seven patients presenting vertically deficient edentulous ridges were treated by means of distraction osteogenesis with an intraoral alveolar distractor. Approximately 3 months after consolidation of the distracted segments, 20 ITI solid screw SLA implants were placed in the distracted areas. Three to 4 months later, abutments were connected and prosthetic loading of the implants started. During implant site preparation, bone biopsies were taken at the implant sites with trephine burrs for histologic and histometric analyses. Results: The mean follow-up after the initial prosthetic loading was 18 months (range 12-24 months). The mean bone gain obtained at the end of distraction was 7 mm (range 5-9 mm). The cumulative success rate of implants 2 years after the onset of prosthetic loading was 95%, whereas the survival rate of implants was 100%. The newly formed bone consisted of woven bone reinforced by parallel-fibered bone with bone marrow spaces between the bone trabeculae. The bone area fraction in the distraction region ranged from 21.6% to 57.8% (38.5 ± 11.7%). Discussion and conclusions: Results from this study showed that (a) distraction osteogenesis is a reliable technique for the correction of vertically deficient edentulous ridges, (b) the regenerated bone withstood the functional demands of implant loading, (c) survival and success rates of implants placed in the distracted areas were consistent with those of implants placed in native bone, and (d) there is sufficient bone volume and maturity in the distracted region for primary stability of the implant. Copyright © Blackwell Munksgaard 2006.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAlveolar Process - Anatomy & Histology - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implantsen_US
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMandible - Anatomy & Histology - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOsteogenesis, Distraction - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titleQuality and quantity of bone following alveolar distraction osteogenesis in the human mandibleen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0501.2005.01247.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid16907770-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33746331995en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33746331995&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage394en_US
dc.identifier.epage402en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000239187900007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiapasco, M=34970812400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBosshardt, DD=6603806230en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike774025-

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