File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: (B1) Candida and mycotic infections.

Title(B1) Candida and mycotic infections.
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherInternational and American Associations for Dental Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://adr.sagepub.com/
Citation
Advances In Dental Research., 2006, v. 19 n. 1, p. 130-138 How to Cite?
AbstractOral candidiasis (OC) is the most common mucosal manifestation of HIV infection. This workshop examined OC and other mycoses associated with HIV infection. Historically, blood CD4 cell numbers were the primary prognosticator for the development of OC. However, a study that statistically evaluated the predictive role of HIV viral load vs. CD4 cell counts revealed viral load to be a stronger predictor for OC. The role of biofilms and antifungal resistance in recalcitrant OC is unclear at present. In general, micro-organisms including yeasts in biofilms are more resistant to antifungals than their planktonic counterparts. When the remaining organisms are eliminated, the few resistant organisms may not be problematic, because they are present in low numbers. Unusual exotic mycoses in HIV-infected patients are more common in patients from the developing than the developed world. These infections may be recurrent and recalcitrant to therapy, be present in multiple and uncommon sites, increase with the progression of HIV disease, and may play a role similar to that of the more common mycoses. Typing and subtyping of yeasts are probably not critical to the clinical management of candidiasis caused by Candida albicans and non-albicans strains, including C. dubliniensis, because it is responsive to antifungal therapy. C. glabrata is probably the only exception. The presence of oral thrush in infants younger than 6 months of age is associated with an increased post-natal transmission risk of HIV infection. Thus, perinatal retroviral therapy should be combined with the treatment of oral thrush to prevent the post-natal acquisition of HIV.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154410
ISSN
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.960

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCoogan, MMen_US
dc.contributor.authorFidel Jr, PLen_US
dc.contributor.authorKomesu, MCen_US
dc.contributor.authorMaeda, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:25:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:25:10Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationAdvances In Dental Research., 2006, v. 19 n. 1, p. 130-138en_US
dc.identifier.issn1544-0737en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154410-
dc.description.abstractOral candidiasis (OC) is the most common mucosal manifestation of HIV infection. This workshop examined OC and other mycoses associated with HIV infection. Historically, blood CD4 cell numbers were the primary prognosticator for the development of OC. However, a study that statistically evaluated the predictive role of HIV viral load vs. CD4 cell counts revealed viral load to be a stronger predictor for OC. The role of biofilms and antifungal resistance in recalcitrant OC is unclear at present. In general, micro-organisms including yeasts in biofilms are more resistant to antifungals than their planktonic counterparts. When the remaining organisms are eliminated, the few resistant organisms may not be problematic, because they are present in low numbers. Unusual exotic mycoses in HIV-infected patients are more common in patients from the developing than the developed world. These infections may be recurrent and recalcitrant to therapy, be present in multiple and uncommon sites, increase with the progression of HIV disease, and may play a role similar to that of the more common mycoses. Typing and subtyping of yeasts are probably not critical to the clinical management of candidiasis caused by Candida albicans and non-albicans strains, including C. dubliniensis, because it is responsive to antifungal therapy. C. glabrata is probably the only exception. The presence of oral thrush in infants younger than 6 months of age is associated with an increased post-natal transmission risk of HIV infection. Thus, perinatal retroviral therapy should be combined with the treatment of oral thrush to prevent the post-natal acquisition of HIV.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInternational and American Associations for Dental Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://adr.sagepub.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in dental research.en_US
dc.subject.meshAids-Related Opportunistic Infections - Epidemiology - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAntifungal Agents - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshBiofilmsen_US
dc.subject.meshCd4 Lymphocyte Counten_US
dc.subject.meshCandida - Classification - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshCandidiasis, Oral - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDeveloping Countriesen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Fungalen_US
dc.subject.meshHiv Infections - Transmissionen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshMycological Typing Techniquesen_US
dc.subject.meshMycoses - Complications - Drug Therapy - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_US
dc.subject.meshViral Loaden_US
dc.title(B1) Candida and mycotic infections.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/154407370601900124-
dc.identifier.pmid16672563en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33745942709en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros115938-
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage130en_US
dc.identifier.epage138en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCoogan, MM=7003574701en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFidel Jr, PL=7006982411en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKomesu, MC=6603450693en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMaeda, N=14039238100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats