File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Significance of primary stability for osseointegration of dental implants

TitleSignificance of primary stability for osseointegration of dental implants
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2006, v. 17 n. 3, p. 244-250 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: To investigate the significance of the initial stability of dental implants for the establishment of osseointegration in an experimental capsule model for bone augmentation. Material and methods: Sixteen male rats were used in the study. In each rat, muscle-periosteal flaps were elevated on the lateral aspect of the mandibular ramus on both sides, resulting in exposure of the bone surface. Small perforations were then produced in the ramus. A rigid, hemispherical Teflon® capsule with a diameter of 6 mm and a height of 4 mm and with a hole in its middle portion, prepared to fit the circumference of an ITI® HC titanium implant of 2.8 mm in diameter, was fixed to the ramus using 4 mini-screws. On one side of the jaw, the implant was placed through the hole in such a way that its apex did not make contact with the mandibular ramus (test). This placement of the implant did not ensure primary stability. On the other side of the jaw, a similar implant was placed through the hole of the capsule in such a way that contact was made between the implant and the surface of the ramus (control). This provided primary stability of the implant. After placement of the implants, the soft tissues were repositioned over the capsules and sutured. After 1, 3, 6 and 9 months, four animals were sacrificed and subjected to histometric analysis. Results: The mean height of direct bone-to-implant contact of implants with primary stability was 38.8%, 52.9%, 64.6% and 81.3% of the implant length at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months, respectively. Of the bone adjacent to the implant surface, 28.1%, 28.9%, 52.6% and 69.6%, respectively, consisted of mineralized bone. At the test implants, no bone-to-implant contact was observed at any observation time or in any of these non-stabilized specimens. Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicate that primary implant stability is a prerequisite for successful osseointegration, and that implant instability results in fibrous encapsulation, thus confirming previously made clinical observations. Copyright © Blackwell Munksgaard 2006.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154403
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.464
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.427
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLioubavinaHack, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.contributor.authorKarring, Ten_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:25:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:25:07Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2006, v. 17 n. 3, p. 244-250en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154403-
dc.description.abstractAim: To investigate the significance of the initial stability of dental implants for the establishment of osseointegration in an experimental capsule model for bone augmentation. Material and methods: Sixteen male rats were used in the study. In each rat, muscle-periosteal flaps were elevated on the lateral aspect of the mandibular ramus on both sides, resulting in exposure of the bone surface. Small perforations were then produced in the ramus. A rigid, hemispherical Teflon® capsule with a diameter of 6 mm and a height of 4 mm and with a hole in its middle portion, prepared to fit the circumference of an ITI® HC titanium implant of 2.8 mm in diameter, was fixed to the ramus using 4 mini-screws. On one side of the jaw, the implant was placed through the hole in such a way that its apex did not make contact with the mandibular ramus (test). This placement of the implant did not ensure primary stability. On the other side of the jaw, a similar implant was placed through the hole of the capsule in such a way that contact was made between the implant and the surface of the ramus (control). This provided primary stability of the implant. After placement of the implants, the soft tissues were repositioned over the capsules and sutured. After 1, 3, 6 and 9 months, four animals were sacrificed and subjected to histometric analysis. Results: The mean height of direct bone-to-implant contact of implants with primary stability was 38.8%, 52.9%, 64.6% and 81.3% of the implant length at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months, respectively. Of the bone adjacent to the implant surface, 28.1%, 28.9%, 52.6% and 69.6%, respectively, consisted of mineralized bone. At the test implants, no bone-to-implant contact was observed at any observation time or in any of these non-stabilized specimens. Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicate that primary implant stability is a prerequisite for successful osseointegration, and that implant instability results in fibrous encapsulation, thus confirming previously made clinical observations. Copyright © Blackwell Munksgaard 2006.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Matrix - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Resorption - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshConnective Tissue - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implantsen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Materials - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMandible - Pathology - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Animalen_US
dc.subject.meshOsseointegration - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshOsteogenesis - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshOsteotomyen_US
dc.subject.meshPolytetrafluoroethylene - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Wistaren_US
dc.subject.meshSurface Propertiesen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTitanium - Chemistryen_US
dc.titleSignificance of primary stability for osseointegration of dental implantsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0501.2005.01201.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid16672018en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646502118en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33646502118&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage244en_US
dc.identifier.epage250en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237259500002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLioubavinaHack, N=9735826900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarring, T=35560651200en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike613220-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats