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Article: Comparisons of bacterial patterns present at implant and tooth sites in subjects on supportive periodontal therapy: I. Impact of clinical variables, gender and smoking

TitleComparisons of bacterial patterns present at implant and tooth sites in subjects on supportive periodontal therapy: I. Impact of clinical variables, gender and smoking
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2006, v. 17 n. 1, p. 18-24 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: (I) To compare the oral microflora at implant and tooth sites in subjects participating in a periodontal recall program, (II) to test whether the microflora at implant and tooth sites differ as an effect of gingival bleeding (bleeding on probing (BOP)), or pocket probing depth (PPD), and (III) to test whether smoking and gender had an impact on the microflora. Material and methods: Data were collected from 127 implants and all teeth in 56 subjects. Microbiological data were identified by the DNA-DNA checkerboard hybridization. Results: PPD≥4 mm were found in 16.9% of tooth, and at 26.6% of implant sites (P<0.01). Tooth sites with PPD≥4 mm had a 3.1-fold higher bacterial load than implant sites (mean difference: 66%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 40.7-91.3, P<0.001). No differences were found for the red, orange, green, and yellow complexes. A higher total bacterial load was found at implant sites with PPD≥4 mm (mean difference 35.7 × 105, 95% CI: 5.2 (105) to 66.1 (105), P<0.02 with equal variance not assumed). At implant sites, BOP had no impact on bacterial load but influenced the load at tooth sites (P<0.01). Conclusion: BOP, and smoking had no impact on bacteria at implant sites but influenced the bacterial load at tooth sites. Tooth sites harbored more bacteria than implant sites with comparable PPD. The 4 mm PPD cutoff level influenced the distribution and amounts of bacterial loads. The subject factor is explanatory to bacterial load at both tooth and implant sites. Copyright © Blackwell Munksgaard 2006.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154392
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.464
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.427
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAgerbaek, MRen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.contributor.authorPersson, GRen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:25:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:25:03Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2006, v. 17 n. 1, p. 18-24en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154392-
dc.description.abstractObjective: (I) To compare the oral microflora at implant and tooth sites in subjects participating in a periodontal recall program, (II) to test whether the microflora at implant and tooth sites differ as an effect of gingival bleeding (bleeding on probing (BOP)), or pocket probing depth (PPD), and (III) to test whether smoking and gender had an impact on the microflora. Material and methods: Data were collected from 127 implants and all teeth in 56 subjects. Microbiological data were identified by the DNA-DNA checkerboard hybridization. Results: PPD≥4 mm were found in 16.9% of tooth, and at 26.6% of implant sites (P<0.01). Tooth sites with PPD≥4 mm had a 3.1-fold higher bacterial load than implant sites (mean difference: 66%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 40.7-91.3, P<0.001). No differences were found for the red, orange, green, and yellow complexes. A higher total bacterial load was found at implant sites with PPD≥4 mm (mean difference 35.7 × 105, 95% CI: 5.2 (105) to 66.1 (105), P<0.02 with equal variance not assumed). At implant sites, BOP had no impact on bacterial load but influenced the load at tooth sites (P<0.01). Conclusion: BOP, and smoking had no impact on bacteria at implant sites but influenced the bacterial load at tooth sites. Tooth sites harbored more bacteria than implant sites with comparable PPD. The 4 mm PPD cutoff level influenced the distribution and amounts of bacterial loads. The subject factor is explanatory to bacterial load at both tooth and implant sites. Copyright © Blackwell Munksgaard 2006.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshBacteria - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshDna, Bacterial - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implants - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Prophylaxisen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLinear Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshNucleic Acid Hybridization - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Pocket - Etiology - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontitis - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSmoking - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametricen_US
dc.titleComparisons of bacterial patterns present at implant and tooth sites in subjects on supportive periodontal therapy: I. Impact of clinical variables, gender and smokingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0501.2005.01190.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid16441781-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645048187en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33645048187&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage18en_US
dc.identifier.epage24en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000234854400003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAgerbaek, MR=12787694200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPersson, GR=7101853867en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike479720-

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