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Article: Does excessive occlusal load affect osseointegration? An experimental study in the dog

TitleDoes excessive occlusal load affect osseointegration? An experimental study in the dog
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2004, v. 15 n. 3, p. 259-268 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of excessive occlusal load following placement of titanium implants in the presence of healthy peri-implant mucosal tissues. Materials and methods: Mandibular bilateral recipient sites in six Labrador dogs were established by extracting premolars and molars. After 3 months, two TPS (titanium plasma sprayed) implants and two SLA (sandblasted, large grit, acid etched) implants were placed on each side of the mandible in each dog. Three implants were lost in the initial healing phase, leaving 45 implants for evaluation. Following 6 months of healing, gold crowns were placed on implants on the test side of the mandible. The crowns were in supra-occlusal contact with the opposing teeth in order to create excessive occlusal load. Implants on the control side were not loaded. Plaque control was performed throughout the experimental period. Clinical measurements and standardised radiographs were obtained at baseline and 1, 3 and 8 months after loading. At 8 months, the dogs were killed and histologic analyses were performed. Results: At 8 months, all implants were osseointegrated. The mean probing depth was 2.5 ± 0.3 and 2.6 ± 0.3 mm at unloaded and loaded implants, respectively. Radiographically, the mean distance from the implant shoulder to the marginal bone level was 3.6 ± 0.4 mm in the control group and 3.7 ± 0.2 mm in the test group. Control and test groups were compared using paired non-parametric analyses. There were no statistically significant changes for any of the parameters from baseline to 8 months in the loaded and unloaded implants. Histologic evaluation showed a mean mineralised bone-to-implant contact of 73% in the control implants and 74% in the test implants, with no statistically significant difference between test and control implants. Conclusion: In the presence of peri-implant mucosal health, a period of 8 months of excessive occlusal load on titanium implants did not result in loss of osseointegration or marginal bone loss when compared with non-loaded implants. Copyright © Blackwell Munksgaard 2004.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154376
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.464
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.427
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHeitzMayfield, LJen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchmid, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorWeigel, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorGerber, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorBosshardt, DDen_US
dc.contributor.authorJönsson, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:24:58Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:24:58Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2004, v. 15 n. 3, p. 259-268en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154376-
dc.description.abstractAim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of excessive occlusal load following placement of titanium implants in the presence of healthy peri-implant mucosal tissues. Materials and methods: Mandibular bilateral recipient sites in six Labrador dogs were established by extracting premolars and molars. After 3 months, two TPS (titanium plasma sprayed) implants and two SLA (sandblasted, large grit, acid etched) implants were placed on each side of the mandible in each dog. Three implants were lost in the initial healing phase, leaving 45 implants for evaluation. Following 6 months of healing, gold crowns were placed on implants on the test side of the mandible. The crowns were in supra-occlusal contact with the opposing teeth in order to create excessive occlusal load. Implants on the control side were not loaded. Plaque control was performed throughout the experimental period. Clinical measurements and standardised radiographs were obtained at baseline and 1, 3 and 8 months after loading. At 8 months, the dogs were killed and histologic analyses were performed. Results: At 8 months, all implants were osseointegrated. The mean probing depth was 2.5 ± 0.3 and 2.6 ± 0.3 mm at unloaded and loaded implants, respectively. Radiographically, the mean distance from the implant shoulder to the marginal bone level was 3.6 ± 0.4 mm in the control group and 3.7 ± 0.2 mm in the test group. Control and test groups were compared using paired non-parametric analyses. There were no statistically significant changes for any of the parameters from baseline to 8 months in the loaded and unloaded implants. Histologic evaluation showed a mean mineralised bone-to-implant contact of 73% in the control implants and 74% in the test implants, with no statistically significant difference between test and control implants. Conclusion: In the presence of peri-implant mucosal health, a period of 8 months of excessive occlusal load on titanium implants did not result in loss of osseointegration or marginal bone loss when compared with non-loaded implants. Copyright © Blackwell Munksgaard 2004.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAcid Etching, Dentalen_US
dc.subject.meshAir Abrasion, Dentalen_US
dc.subject.meshAlveolar Bone Loss - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshAlveolar Process - Pathology - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBite Forceen_US
dc.subject.meshCoated Materials, Biocompatibleen_US
dc.subject.meshCrownsen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implantsen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Prosthesis Designen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Prosthesis, Implant-Supporteden_US
dc.subject.meshDogsen_US
dc.subject.meshMandible - Pathology - Physiopathology - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Animalen_US
dc.subject.meshOsseointegration - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Pocket - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTitaniumen_US
dc.subject.meshWound Healingen_US
dc.titleDoes excessive occlusal load affect osseointegration? An experimental study in the dogen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0501.2004.01019.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid15142087-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-3042524214en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-3042524214&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage259en_US
dc.identifier.epage268en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000221298600001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHeitzMayfield, LJ=6602309146en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchmid, B=7102654027en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeigel, C=7005466378en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGerber, S=36002099900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBosshardt, DD=6603806230en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJönsson, J=7102223014en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US

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