File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Current issues in dental practice management. Part 1. The importance of shared values.

TitleCurrent issues in dental practice management. Part 1. The importance of shared values.
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherFaculty of Dental Practitioners. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.fgdp.org.uk/journals/pdc
Citation
Primary Dental Care : Journal Of The Faculty Of General Dental Practitioners (Uk), 2003, v. 10 n. 2, p. 37-39 How to Cite?
AbstractThere can be few who would argue with the notion that the nature of dental practice in the United Kingdom has changed dramatically over the last couple of decades. A variety of factors, including new clinical techniques, growing consumerism, a much greater awareness of health-related and well-being issues in the public at large, as well as a marked deregulation within the dental profession, the development of vocational training and recently mandatory lifelong learning, the growing number of females working in the profession, and an increasing reluctance of young dentists to finance dental practices have all combined to create an environment which has enabled and encouraged a move away from traditional forms of dental care delivery. Instead, there has been considerable growth in independently-funded practice and a commensurate growth in the number of practices operating under a corporate body umbrella of one form or another. Currently there are 27 corporate bodies registered with the General Dental Council (GDC) with the likelihood of more in the future given the proposed GDC review. This will no doubt take into consideration European law, under which the restriction within the Dentist's Act on the number of corporate bodies is likely to be untenable. Although they still have only a small share of the dental market--with 4% of all dentists in the UK in 1999--they have expanded rapidly from a small base. The data available at the time the paper was written indicate that the global total of fees earned from dentistry in the UK in the financial year 2001/2002 was almost 3 billion Pounds, of which 1.9 billion Pounds (64%) came from NHS fees and 1.1 billion Pounds (36%) from private fees. Of this 1.9 billion Pounds received in NHS fees in 2001/2002, 0.55 billion Pounds were paid by patients who were not exempt from charges, bringing the total amount actually paid out of patients' pockets for dental treatment to 1.65 billion Pounds. Compare these figures with 1996/1997 when NHS fees stood at 1.6 billion Pounds (71%) and private fees at 0.6 billion Pounds (29%) and it can be seen that while the size of the whole market has grown NHS fees have risen by around 18% while private sector fees have gone up by 64% during the same period. It cannot be said therefore that NHS dentistry has disappeared although it is clear that access to NHS dentistry has been and may still be difficult in some parts of the country. The Department of Health in England has responded by developing 'access centres' and in the recently published Options for Change sets out sweeping proposals to revitalise NHS dentistry and delegate decisions over funding to a local level. It is far from clear what the consequences of these changes will be. However, one possible scenario is that in many parts of the UK, although relief of pain, prevention and restoration of function will be funded by the NHS, other than in 'special circumstances' such as after trauma and inherited conditions 'cosmetic embellishment' will not be funded. In which case, ever increasing public interest in personal appearance may well lead to further growth in private dentistry. Against a background of change and uncertainty, this series of articles explores some of the issues facing dentists coming to terms with working in this brave new world. This first part examines an aspect of dental practice that is seldom discussed openly and yet is of such fundamental importance that it is the cornerstone of all successful practices and the main fault line in unsuccessful ones, namely the nature and strength of practice values.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154337
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.129

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNewsome, PRen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:24:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:24:40Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationPrimary Dental Care : Journal Of The Faculty Of General Dental Practitioners (Uk), 2003, v. 10 n. 2, p. 37-39en_US
dc.identifier.issn1355-7610en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154337-
dc.description.abstractThere can be few who would argue with the notion that the nature of dental practice in the United Kingdom has changed dramatically over the last couple of decades. A variety of factors, including new clinical techniques, growing consumerism, a much greater awareness of health-related and well-being issues in the public at large, as well as a marked deregulation within the dental profession, the development of vocational training and recently mandatory lifelong learning, the growing number of females working in the profession, and an increasing reluctance of young dentists to finance dental practices have all combined to create an environment which has enabled and encouraged a move away from traditional forms of dental care delivery. Instead, there has been considerable growth in independently-funded practice and a commensurate growth in the number of practices operating under a corporate body umbrella of one form or another. Currently there are 27 corporate bodies registered with the General Dental Council (GDC) with the likelihood of more in the future given the proposed GDC review. This will no doubt take into consideration European law, under which the restriction within the Dentist's Act on the number of corporate bodies is likely to be untenable. Although they still have only a small share of the dental market--with 4% of all dentists in the UK in 1999--they have expanded rapidly from a small base. The data available at the time the paper was written indicate that the global total of fees earned from dentistry in the UK in the financial year 2001/2002 was almost 3 billion Pounds, of which 1.9 billion Pounds (64%) came from NHS fees and 1.1 billion Pounds (36%) from private fees. Of this 1.9 billion Pounds received in NHS fees in 2001/2002, 0.55 billion Pounds were paid by patients who were not exempt from charges, bringing the total amount actually paid out of patients' pockets for dental treatment to 1.65 billion Pounds. Compare these figures with 1996/1997 when NHS fees stood at 1.6 billion Pounds (71%) and private fees at 0.6 billion Pounds (29%) and it can be seen that while the size of the whole market has grown NHS fees have risen by around 18% while private sector fees have gone up by 64% during the same period. It cannot be said therefore that NHS dentistry has disappeared although it is clear that access to NHS dentistry has been and may still be difficult in some parts of the country. The Department of Health in England has responded by developing 'access centres' and in the recently published Options for Change sets out sweeping proposals to revitalise NHS dentistry and delegate decisions over funding to a local level. It is far from clear what the consequences of these changes will be. However, one possible scenario is that in many parts of the UK, although relief of pain, prevention and restoration of function will be funded by the NHS, other than in 'special circumstances' such as after trauma and inherited conditions 'cosmetic embellishment' will not be funded. In which case, ever increasing public interest in personal appearance may well lead to further growth in private dentistry. Against a background of change and uncertainty, this series of articles explores some of the issues facing dentists coming to terms with working in this brave new world. This first part examines an aspect of dental practice that is seldom discussed openly and yet is of such fundamental importance that it is the cornerstone of all successful practices and the main fault line in unsuccessful ones, namely the nature and strength of practice values.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherFaculty of Dental Practitioners. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.fgdp.org.uk/journals/pdcen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPrimary dental care : journal of the Faculty of General Dental Practitioners (UK)en_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude Of Health Personnelen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Staff - Organization & Administrationen_US
dc.subject.meshDentist-Patient Relationsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGreat Britainen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonnel Managementen_US
dc.subject.meshPractice Management, Dental - Economics - Organization & Administrationen_US
dc.subject.meshPrivate Practice - Economics - Organization & Administrationen_US
dc.subject.meshProfessional Corporations - Economics - Organization & Administrationen_US
dc.subject.meshProfessional-Patient Relationsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Valuesen_US
dc.titleCurrent issues in dental practice management. Part 1. The importance of shared values.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailNewsome, PR:newsome@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityNewsome, PR=rp00017en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid12736956-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2142687641en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros82660-
dc.identifier.volume10en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage37en_US
dc.identifier.epage39en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNewsome, PR=35830103400en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats