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Article: Proportional distribution of the red complex and its individual pathogens after sample storage using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique

TitleProportional distribution of the red complex and its individual pathogens after sample storage using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CPE
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Periodontology, 2005, v. 32 n. 6, p. 628-633 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Information on the impact of sample storage prior to analysis by DNA methods is limited. Aims: To investigate the effect of microbial sample storage on bacterial detection and proportional distribution of the red complex and its individual pathogens. Material and Methods: Subgingival plaque samples were analysed by (1) immediate processing, (2) after storage at +4°C for 6 weeks, (3) after storage at -20°C for 6 months or (4) after storage at -20°C for 12 months using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Results: Proportional distribution of the red complex did not differ between the first three protocols. However, the total bacterial DNA for pathogens studied decreased significantly in protocols 3 and 4. Relative amounts of Tannerella forsythensis, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola remained stable in the second protocols and changed in an unpredictable way if stored for 6 or 12 months. Conclusions: Results from samples stored for maximum 6 months at -20°C with high proportional amounts of the red complex and T. denticola may be used as an indicator of persistence. All bacterial samples for DNA extraction should be processed following a standardized storage protocol (i.e. samples stored at +4°C for maximum 6 weeks) in order to get comparable qualitative and quantitative results for total DNA, bacterial complexes and individual pathogens. Most representative results are yielded if processing and hybridization could be performed immediately after sampling. © Blackwell Munksgaard, 2005.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154333
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.915
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.848
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKatsoulis, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.contributor.authorPersson, GRen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:24:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:24:39Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Periodontology, 2005, v. 32 n. 6, p. 628-633en_US
dc.identifier.issn0303-6979en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154333-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Information on the impact of sample storage prior to analysis by DNA methods is limited. Aims: To investigate the effect of microbial sample storage on bacterial detection and proportional distribution of the red complex and its individual pathogens. Material and Methods: Subgingival plaque samples were analysed by (1) immediate processing, (2) after storage at +4°C for 6 weeks, (3) after storage at -20°C for 6 months or (4) after storage at -20°C for 12 months using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Results: Proportional distribution of the red complex did not differ between the first three protocols. However, the total bacterial DNA for pathogens studied decreased significantly in protocols 3 and 4. Relative amounts of Tannerella forsythensis, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola remained stable in the second protocols and changed in an unpredictable way if stored for 6 or 12 months. Conclusions: Results from samples stored for maximum 6 months at -20°C with high proportional amounts of the red complex and T. denticola may be used as an indicator of persistence. All bacterial samples for DNA extraction should be processed following a standardized storage protocol (i.e. samples stored at +4°C for maximum 6 weeks) in order to get comparable qualitative and quantitative results for total DNA, bacterial complexes and individual pathogens. Most representative results are yielded if processing and hybridization could be performed immediately after sampling. © Blackwell Munksgaard, 2005.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CPEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Periodontologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshDna Probesen_US
dc.subject.meshDna, Bacterial - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Plaque - Genetics - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLinear Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshPorphyromonas Gingivalis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPreservation, Biologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametricen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTreponema Denticola - Geneticsen_US
dc.titleProportional distribution of the red complex and its individual pathogens after sample storage using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization techniqueen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-051X.2005.00727.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid15882222-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-20344391349en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-20344391349&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume32en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage628en_US
dc.identifier.epage633en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000228976900015-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKatsoulis, J=8567429400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPersson, GR=7101853867en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike190620-

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