File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Emotional effects of tooth loss in community-dwelling elderly people in Hong Kong
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleEmotional effects of tooth loss in community-dwelling elderly people in Hong Kong
 
AuthorsMcmillan, AS1
Wong, MCM1
 
Issue Date2004
 
PublisherQuintessence Publishing Co, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.quintpub.com
 
CitationInternational Journal Of Prosthodontics, 2004, v. 17 n. 2, p. 172-176 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractPurpose: This study investigated the emotional effects of tooth loss among community-dwelling elderly people in Hong Kong and compared the effects among edentulous and partially dentate elderly. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire study involved 233 southern Chinese elderly who were recruited and interviewed at social centers for elderly people throughout Hong Kong. Data were analyzed using chi-square or chi-square exact tests. Results: Twenty-two percent of the participants reported difficulty accepting tooth loss, with no difference between the edentulous and partially dentate. However, 95% stated that their confidence was unaffected. For more than half of elderly people, tooth loss had a negative effect on food choice and enjoyment of food, with removable denture wearers having greater restrictions. Avoiding going out, eating in public, and forming close relationships were less-common problems. Twenty-two percent felt unprepared for the effects of tooth loss, and more than half said that better communication with the dentist would have helped. Conclusion: The emotional effects of tooth loss were not marked among elderly people, and there were no differences between edentulous and partially dentate individuals. However, significant disability was experienced because of restrictions in daily living activities. Restrictions were more severe in people who had lost enough teeth to necessitate denture wearing.
 
ISSN0893-2174
2013 Impact Factor: 1.185
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMcmillan, AS
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, MCM
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:24:36Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:24:36Z
 
dc.date.issued2004
 
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study investigated the emotional effects of tooth loss among community-dwelling elderly people in Hong Kong and compared the effects among edentulous and partially dentate elderly. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire study involved 233 southern Chinese elderly who were recruited and interviewed at social centers for elderly people throughout Hong Kong. Data were analyzed using chi-square or chi-square exact tests. Results: Twenty-two percent of the participants reported difficulty accepting tooth loss, with no difference between the edentulous and partially dentate. However, 95% stated that their confidence was unaffected. For more than half of elderly people, tooth loss had a negative effect on food choice and enjoyment of food, with removable denture wearers having greater restrictions. Avoiding going out, eating in public, and forming close relationships were less-common problems. Twenty-two percent felt unprepared for the effects of tooth loss, and more than half said that better communication with the dentist would have helped. Conclusion: The emotional effects of tooth loss were not marked among elderly people, and there were no differences between edentulous and partially dentate individuals. However, significant disability was experienced because of restrictions in daily living activities. Restrictions were more severe in people who had lost enough teeth to necessitate denture wearing.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Prosthodontics, 2004, v. 17 n. 2, p. 172-176 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage176
 
dc.identifier.hkuros88876
 
dc.identifier.issn0893-2174
2013 Impact Factor: 1.185
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.pmid15119867
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1842861496
 
dc.identifier.spage172
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154323
 
dc.identifier.volume17
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherQuintessence Publishing Co, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.quintpub.com
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Prosthodontics
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychological
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Over
 
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distribution
 
dc.subject.meshDenture, Complete - Psychology
 
dc.subject.meshDenture, Partial, Removable - Psychology
 
dc.subject.meshEating - Psychology
 
dc.subject.meshHong Kong
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshMouth, Edentulous - Psychology
 
dc.subject.meshQuality Of Life
 
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
 
dc.subject.meshSelf Efficacy
 
dc.titleEmotional effects of tooth loss in community-dwelling elderly people in Hong Kong
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Mcmillan, AS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, MCM</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-08-08T08:24:36Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-08-08T08:24:36Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2004</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>International Journal Of Prosthodontics, 2004, v. 17 n. 2, p. 172-176</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0893-2174</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/154323</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Purpose: This study investigated the emotional effects of tooth loss among community-dwelling elderly people in Hong Kong and compared the effects among edentulous and partially dentate elderly. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire study involved 233 southern Chinese elderly who were recruited and interviewed at social centers for elderly people throughout Hong Kong. Data were analyzed using chi-square or chi-square exact tests. Results: Twenty-two percent of the participants reported difficulty accepting tooth loss, with no difference between the edentulous and partially dentate. However, 95% stated that their confidence was unaffected. For more than half of elderly people, tooth loss had a negative effect on food choice and enjoyment of food, with removable denture wearers having greater restrictions. Avoiding going out, eating in public, and forming close relationships were less-common problems. Twenty-two percent felt unprepared for the effects of tooth loss, and more than half said that better communication with the dentist would have helped. Conclusion: The emotional effects of tooth loss were not marked among elderly people, and there were no differences between edentulous and partially dentate individuals. However, significant disability was experienced because of restrictions in daily living activities. Restrictions were more severe in people who had lost enough teeth to necessitate denture wearing.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.quintpub.com</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>International Journal of Prosthodontics</relation.ispartof>
<subject.mesh>Adaptation, Psychological</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Aged</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Aged, 80 And Over</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Chi-Square Distribution</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Denture, Complete - Psychology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Denture, Partial, Removable - Psychology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Eating - Psychology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Hong Kong</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Humans</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Middle Aged</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Mouth, Edentulous - Psychology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Quality Of Life</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Questionnaires</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Self Efficacy</subject.mesh>
<title>Emotional effects of tooth loss in community-dwelling elderly people in Hong Kong</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>Link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.pmid>15119867</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-1842861496</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>88876</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-1842861496&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>17</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>2</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>172</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>176</identifier.epage>
<publisher.place>United States</publisher.place>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong