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Article: SEM and TEM analysis on water degradation of human dentinal collagen

TitleSEM and TEM analysis on water degradation of human dentinal collagen
Authors
KeywordsCollagen fibril
Degradation
Sem
Tem
Water storage testing
Issue Date2003
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0021-9304:1/
Citation
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials, 2003, v. 66 n. 1, p. 287-298 How to Cite?
AbstractRecently several long-term studies have reported evidence of the hydrolytic degradation of collagen fibrils based on fractured surface observations after bond testing. Those studies suggested that one cause of the decline in the bond strength was the degradation of the collagen fibrils within the bonds. However, one concern has been raised that the dentinal collagen fibrils may be stable in water that does not contain oral bacteria or enzymes. Therefore, the present study aimed to clarify the micromorphological change in naked collagen fibrils after 500 days of water storage. To prepare exposed collagen fibrils, sectioned and polished human dentin surfaces were acid conditioned for 15 s with the use of two commercially available acid conditioners: All-Etch (10% phosphoric acid) and Uni-Etch (32% phosphoric acid) (Bisco, Inc.). Those specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 1 day (control) for 500 days. After the storage periods, the samples were examined with the use of SEM and TEM. Under SEM and TEM examination, micromorphological alterations (disarrangement of collagen web, widening the interfibrillar space, and the thinning diameter of collagen fibrils) were found in the specimens after 500 days in water. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154258
ISSN
2004 Impact Factor: 3.652
2006 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.474
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHashimoto, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorTay, FRen_US
dc.contributor.authorOhno, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorSano, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorKaga, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorYiu, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorKumagai, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorKudou, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorKubota, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorOguchi, Hen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:24:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:24:15Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials, 2003, v. 66 n. 1, p. 287-298en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-9304en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154258-
dc.description.abstractRecently several long-term studies have reported evidence of the hydrolytic degradation of collagen fibrils based on fractured surface observations after bond testing. Those studies suggested that one cause of the decline in the bond strength was the degradation of the collagen fibrils within the bonds. However, one concern has been raised that the dentinal collagen fibrils may be stable in water that does not contain oral bacteria or enzymes. Therefore, the present study aimed to clarify the micromorphological change in naked collagen fibrils after 500 days of water storage. To prepare exposed collagen fibrils, sectioned and polished human dentin surfaces were acid conditioned for 15 s with the use of two commercially available acid conditioners: All-Etch (10% phosphoric acid) and Uni-Etch (32% phosphoric acid) (Bisco, Inc.). Those specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 1 day (control) for 500 days. After the storage periods, the samples were examined with the use of SEM and TEM. Under SEM and TEM examination, micromorphological alterations (disarrangement of collagen web, widening the interfibrillar space, and the thinning diameter of collagen fibrils) were found in the specimens after 500 days in water. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0021-9304:1/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterialsen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.-
dc.subjectCollagen fibrilen_US
dc.subjectDegradationen_US
dc.subjectSemen_US
dc.subjectTemen_US
dc.subjectWater storage testingen_US
dc.titleSEM and TEM analysis on water degradation of human dentinal collagenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTay, FR: franktay@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, C: ckyyiu@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, C=rp00018en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jbm.b.10560-
dc.identifier.pmid12808586-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0346123135en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros108256-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0346123135&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume66en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage287en_US
dc.identifier.epage298en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000183923700001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOguchi, H=7006630681en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKubota, M=36668739100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKudou, Y=6701459797en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKumagai, H=7202149369en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYiu, C=7007115156en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKaga, M=7006029971en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSano, H=7403159147en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOhno, H=7403244870en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTay, FR=7102091962en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHashimoto, M=35380578400en_US

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