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Article: De novo alveolar bone formation adjacent to endosseous implants: A model study in the dog

TitleDe novo alveolar bone formation adjacent to endosseous implants: A model study in the dog
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2003, v. 14 n. 3, p. 251-262 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To describe a model for the investigation of different phases of wound healing that are involved in the process resulting in osseointegration. Material and methods: The implants used for the study of early healing had a geometry that corresponded to that of a solid screw implant with an SLA surface configuration. A circumferential trough had been prepared within the thread region (intra-osseous portion) that established a geometrically well-defined wound compartment. Twenty Labrador dogs received 160 experimental devices totally to allow the evaluation of healing between 2 h and 12 weeks. Both ground sections and decalcified sections were prepared from different implant sites. Results: The experimental chamber used appeared to be conducive for the study of early phases of bone formation. The ground sections provided an overview of the various phases of soft and hard tissue formation, while the decalcified, thin sections enabled a more detailed study of events involved in bone tissue modeling and remodeling. The initially empty wound chamber became occupied with a coagulum and a granulation tissue that was replaced by a provisional matrix. The process of bone formation started already during the first week. The newly formed bone present at the lateral border of the cut bony bed appeared to be continuous with the parent bone, but woven bone was also found on the SLA surface at a distance from the parent bone. This primary bone that included trabeculae of woven bone was replaced by parallel-fibered and/or lamellar bone and marrow. Between 1 and 2 weeks, the bone tissue immediately lateral to the pitch region, responsible for primary mechanical stability of the device, became resorbed and replaced with newly formed viable bone. Despite this temporary loss of hard tissue contact, the implants remained clinically stable at all times. Conclusion: Osseointegration represents a dynamic process both during its establishment and its maintenance. In the establishment phase, there is a delicate interplay between bone resorption in contact regions (between the titanium body and mineralized bone) and bone formation in 'contact- free' areas. During the maintenance phase, osseointegration is secured through continuous remodeling and adaptation to function.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154249
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.464
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.427
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBerglundh, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorAbrahamsson, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.contributor.authorLindhe, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:24:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:24:11Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2003, v. 14 n. 3, p. 251-262en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154249-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To describe a model for the investigation of different phases of wound healing that are involved in the process resulting in osseointegration. Material and methods: The implants used for the study of early healing had a geometry that corresponded to that of a solid screw implant with an SLA surface configuration. A circumferential trough had been prepared within the thread region (intra-osseous portion) that established a geometrically well-defined wound compartment. Twenty Labrador dogs received 160 experimental devices totally to allow the evaluation of healing between 2 h and 12 weeks. Both ground sections and decalcified sections were prepared from different implant sites. Results: The experimental chamber used appeared to be conducive for the study of early phases of bone formation. The ground sections provided an overview of the various phases of soft and hard tissue formation, while the decalcified, thin sections enabled a more detailed study of events involved in bone tissue modeling and remodeling. The initially empty wound chamber became occupied with a coagulum and a granulation tissue that was replaced by a provisional matrix. The process of bone formation started already during the first week. The newly formed bone present at the lateral border of the cut bony bed appeared to be continuous with the parent bone, but woven bone was also found on the SLA surface at a distance from the parent bone. This primary bone that included trabeculae of woven bone was replaced by parallel-fibered and/or lamellar bone and marrow. Between 1 and 2 weeks, the bone tissue immediately lateral to the pitch region, responsible for primary mechanical stability of the device, became resorbed and replaced with newly formed viable bone. Despite this temporary loss of hard tissue contact, the implants remained clinically stable at all times. Conclusion: Osseointegration represents a dynamic process both during its establishment and its maintenance. In the establishment phase, there is a delicate interplay between bone resorption in contact regions (between the titanium body and mineralized bone) and bone formation in 'contact- free' areas. During the maintenance phase, osseointegration is secured through continuous remodeling and adaptation to function.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAlveolar Process - Pathology - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Coagulation - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Remodeling - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Resorption - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implantsen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Prosthesis Designen_US
dc.subject.meshDogsen_US
dc.subject.meshGranulation Tissue - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMandible - Pathology - Physiopathology - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Animalen_US
dc.subject.meshOsseointegrationen_US
dc.subject.meshOsteogenesis - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSurface Propertiesen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshWound Healing - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleDe novo alveolar bone formation adjacent to endosseous implants: A model study in the dogen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1034/j.1600-0501.2003.00972.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid12755774-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0042883974en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0042883974&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage251en_US
dc.identifier.epage262en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000183419800001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBerglundh, T=26643204700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAbrahamsson, I=9635463000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLindhe, J=7101988857en_US

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