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Article: Actinomyces spp. in supragingival plaque of ethnic Chinese preschool children with and without active dental caries

TitleActinomyces spp. in supragingival plaque of ethnic Chinese preschool children with and without active dental caries
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/CRE
Citation
Caries Research, 2003, v. 37 n. 5, p. 381-390 How to Cite?
AbstractVery limited molecular epidemiological data are available on the role of Actinomyces spp. in the pathogenesis of caries in the primary dentition. Therefore, we investigated their distribution in supragingival plaque of ethnic Chinese preschool children from Singapore and Hong Kong, either with or without active caries. Plaque samples were taken from intact interproximal enamel areas using dental floss. Bacterial genomic DNA of each sample was extracted and variable regions of 16S ribosomal DNA amplified and labelled with digoxigenin. Oligonucleotide probes specific for Actinomyces bovis, Actinomyces gerencseriae, Actinomyces israelii, Actinomyces meyeri, Actinomyces odontolyticus, catalase-negative Actinomyces naeslundii (genospecies 1 and 2) and catalase-positive Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 2 (previously Actinomyces viscosus serotype II) were used to detect these species using Southern hybridization with a Minislot and Miniblotter system. A. odontolyticus, A. gerencseriae and A. meyeri were detected with similar frequency in both Singapore and Hong Kong samples or in those with and without active caries. However, the prevalence of A. naeslundii was significantly different in the two locales (p < 0.05). A. odontolyticus (88.7%), A. gerencseriae (56.6%) and A. naeslundii (50.9%) were detected in a majority of the samples and the positive hybridization signals of A. gerencseriae in the caries-active group were stronger than from the caries-free group. A. bovis and A. israelii were undetectable in any of the samples. These data imply that A. odontolyticus, A. naeslundii and A. gerencseriae may play an important role in supragingival plaque formation on primary teeth in ethnic Chinese, with others such as A. meyeri contributing. Copyright © 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154246
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.278
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.014
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorYip, HKen_US
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECMen_US
dc.contributor.authorTeo, CSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:24:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:24:10Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationCaries Research, 2003, v. 37 n. 5, p. 381-390en_US
dc.identifier.issn0008-6568en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154246-
dc.description.abstractVery limited molecular epidemiological data are available on the role of Actinomyces spp. in the pathogenesis of caries in the primary dentition. Therefore, we investigated their distribution in supragingival plaque of ethnic Chinese preschool children from Singapore and Hong Kong, either with or without active caries. Plaque samples were taken from intact interproximal enamel areas using dental floss. Bacterial genomic DNA of each sample was extracted and variable regions of 16S ribosomal DNA amplified and labelled with digoxigenin. Oligonucleotide probes specific for Actinomyces bovis, Actinomyces gerencseriae, Actinomyces israelii, Actinomyces meyeri, Actinomyces odontolyticus, catalase-negative Actinomyces naeslundii (genospecies 1 and 2) and catalase-positive Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 2 (previously Actinomyces viscosus serotype II) were used to detect these species using Southern hybridization with a Minislot and Miniblotter system. A. odontolyticus, A. gerencseriae and A. meyeri were detected with similar frequency in both Singapore and Hong Kong samples or in those with and without active caries. However, the prevalence of A. naeslundii was significantly different in the two locales (p < 0.05). A. odontolyticus (88.7%), A. gerencseriae (56.6%) and A. naeslundii (50.9%) were detected in a majority of the samples and the positive hybridization signals of A. gerencseriae in the caries-active group were stronger than from the caries-free group. A. bovis and A. israelii were undetectable in any of the samples. These data imply that A. odontolyticus, A. naeslundii and A. gerencseriae may play an important role in supragingival plaque formation on primary teeth in ethnic Chinese, with others such as A. meyeri contributing. Copyright © 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/CREen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCaries Researchen_US
dc.rightsCaries Research. Copyright © S Karger AG.-
dc.subject.meshActinomyces - Classification - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshActinomyces Viscosus - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshBlotting, Southernen_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Caries - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Enamel - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Plaque - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reactionen_US
dc.subject.meshSerotypingen_US
dc.subject.meshSingaporeen_US
dc.subject.meshTooth, Deciduous - Microbiologyen_US
dc.titleActinomyces spp. in supragingival plaque of ethnic Chinese preschool children with and without active dental cariesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYip, HK:kevin.h.k.yip@hkusua.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, ECM:hrdplcm@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYip, HK=rp00027en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ECM=rp00015en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000072172en_US
dc.identifier.pmid12925831-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0041883738en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros84862-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0041883738&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume37en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage381en_US
dc.identifier.epage390en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000185138400011-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, G=36882453100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, HK=25423244900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuo, G=55112399700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, ECM=7101705982en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTeo, CS=7102502587en_US

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