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Article: Measuring the impact of oral health on life quality in two national surveys-functionalist versus hermeneutic approaches

TitleMeasuring the impact of oral health on life quality in two national surveys-functionalist versus hermeneutic approaches
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COM
Citation
Community Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology, 2002, v. 30 n. 4, p. 254-259 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: This study compares a functionalist (quantitative) versus a hermeneutic (qualitative) approach to assessing the impact of oral health on life quality in two United Kingdom national surveys.Methods: The vehicles for this study were two Office for National Statistics' Omnibus Surveys completed in 1998 and 1999. In both studies a random probability sample of 3000 household addresses was selected from the British Postcode Address File (PAF). The data were collected by face-to-face interviews with respondents in their homes about how their oral health status affected their quality of life employing a qualitative, hermeneutic approach (1998) and a functionalist, quantitative approach using a battery of questions (1999).Results: Irrespective of study design, in both studies it was apparent that the majority of the public perceived their oral health as affecting their life quality (P > 0.05). Likewise, both approaches identified that oral health affected life quality most frequently through physical aspects of oral health rather than social or psychological. However, using the hermeneutic approach, respondents were less likely to cite that their oral health affected specific aspects of their oral health compared to when a battery of questions were used (P < 0.01). Furthermore, socio-demographic variations in oral health-related quality of life were more apparent when a battery of questions were employed compared to an open-ended approach. Conclusions: Different approaches to assessing oral health-related quality of life yield similar findings in terms of prevalence of oral health's impact and affected ways (domains). However, the different methods influenced the ability to identify socio-demographic disparities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154206
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.233
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.111
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcgrath, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorBedi, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:23:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:23:52Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationCommunity Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology, 2002, v. 30 n. 4, p. 254-259en_US
dc.identifier.issn0301-5661en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154206-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This study compares a functionalist (quantitative) versus a hermeneutic (qualitative) approach to assessing the impact of oral health on life quality in two United Kingdom national surveys.Methods: The vehicles for this study were two Office for National Statistics' Omnibus Surveys completed in 1998 and 1999. In both studies a random probability sample of 3000 household addresses was selected from the British Postcode Address File (PAF). The data were collected by face-to-face interviews with respondents in their homes about how their oral health status affected their quality of life employing a qualitative, hermeneutic approach (1998) and a functionalist, quantitative approach using a battery of questions (1999).Results: Irrespective of study design, in both studies it was apparent that the majority of the public perceived their oral health as affecting their life quality (P > 0.05). Likewise, both approaches identified that oral health affected life quality most frequently through physical aspects of oral health rather than social or psychological. However, using the hermeneutic approach, respondents were less likely to cite that their oral health affected specific aspects of their oral health compared to when a battery of questions were used (P < 0.01). Furthermore, socio-demographic variations in oral health-related quality of life were more apparent when a battery of questions were employed compared to an open-ended approach. Conclusions: Different approaches to assessing oral health-related quality of life yield similar findings in terms of prevalence of oral health's impact and affected ways (domains). However, the different methods influenced the ability to identify socio-demographic disparities.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCommunity Dentistry and Oral Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Health Surveysen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGreat Britainen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOral Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshQuality Of Lifeen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshResearch Designen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Classen_US
dc.titleMeasuring the impact of oral health on life quality in two national surveys-functionalist versus hermeneutic approachesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, C:mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, C=rp00037en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1034/j.1600-0528.2002.300403.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid12147167-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036689589en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros72837-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036689589&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage254en_US
dc.identifier.epage259en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000177150200003-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcGrath, C=7102335507en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBedi, R=7102041494en_US

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