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Article: The influence of hygroscopic expansion of resin-based restorative materials on artificial gap reduction

TitleThe influence of hygroscopic expansion of resin-based restorative materials on artificial gap reduction
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherQuintessence Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.quintessencepublishing.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=3&products_id=243
Citation
Journal Of Adhesive Dentistry, 2002, v. 4 n. 1, p. 61-71 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: This study compared the effect of water sorption on the extent of marginal gap reduction in two resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGICs), two giomers, two compomers, and two resin composites over a twelve-week storage period. Materials and Methods: Artificial gaps were created in 160 borosilicate glass cylinders. One-half of the internal surface of each cylinder was blocked out with wax and the other half was sandblasted. The bonding surface was further treated with 4% hydrofluoric acid, rinsed, and then coated with silane. After removal of the wax, one coat of dentin adhesive was applied to the silane-treated surface of the cylinder, briefly air dried and light cured. Eight light-cured restorative materials were placed incrementally: Vitremer (V), Fuji II LC (FJ), Beautifil (B), Reactmer Paste (R), Compoglass F (C), F2000 (F), Filtek Z250 (Z), and Tetric-Ceram (T). For each material, ten specimens were stored in deionized water (W), and ten (control) in nonaqueous silicone fluid (0) at 37°C. The dimension of the same maximum gap created in each specimen was repeatedly measured at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks. Results: R-W exhibited extensive hygroscopic expansion that resulted in cracking of 40% of glass cylinders after the 2nd week and 70% after the 4th week. One-way ANOVA of the other seven water groups showed significant differences (p < 0.001) among gap widths measured at different time intervals in V-W, FJ-W, C-W, F-W. Both RMGICs had the most significant gap reduction during the first week (p < 0.001). Both compomers exhibited delayed water-sorption characteristics, with more significant gap reduction observed in C-W. B-W was similar to the two resin composites Z-W and T-W and exhibited the least gap reduction. After the first week, there were no significant differences in the percentage reduction in marginal gaps for any of the groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Marginal gap reduction that results from water sorption is more extensive and rapid in RMG-ICs, followed by compomers, whereas composites are relatively stable. Reactmer Paste exhibits rapid and extensive expansion and should probably be avoided in tooth preparations that involve thin unsupported enamel.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154192
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.594
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.486
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorKei, LHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWei, SHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, GSPen_US
dc.contributor.authorTay, FRen_US
dc.contributor.authorPashley, DHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:23:48Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:23:48Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Adhesive Dentistry, 2002, v. 4 n. 1, p. 61-71en_US
dc.identifier.issn1461-5185en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154192-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study compared the effect of water sorption on the extent of marginal gap reduction in two resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGICs), two giomers, two compomers, and two resin composites over a twelve-week storage period. Materials and Methods: Artificial gaps were created in 160 borosilicate glass cylinders. One-half of the internal surface of each cylinder was blocked out with wax and the other half was sandblasted. The bonding surface was further treated with 4% hydrofluoric acid, rinsed, and then coated with silane. After removal of the wax, one coat of dentin adhesive was applied to the silane-treated surface of the cylinder, briefly air dried and light cured. Eight light-cured restorative materials were placed incrementally: Vitremer (V), Fuji II LC (FJ), Beautifil (B), Reactmer Paste (R), Compoglass F (C), F2000 (F), Filtek Z250 (Z), and Tetric-Ceram (T). For each material, ten specimens were stored in deionized water (W), and ten (control) in nonaqueous silicone fluid (0) at 37°C. The dimension of the same maximum gap created in each specimen was repeatedly measured at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks. Results: R-W exhibited extensive hygroscopic expansion that resulted in cracking of 40% of glass cylinders after the 2nd week and 70% after the 4th week. One-way ANOVA of the other seven water groups showed significant differences (p < 0.001) among gap widths measured at different time intervals in V-W, FJ-W, C-W, F-W. Both RMGICs had the most significant gap reduction during the first week (p < 0.001). Both compomers exhibited delayed water-sorption characteristics, with more significant gap reduction observed in C-W. B-W was similar to the two resin composites Z-W and T-W and exhibited the least gap reduction. After the first week, there were no significant differences in the percentage reduction in marginal gaps for any of the groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Marginal gap reduction that results from water sorption is more extensive and rapid in RMG-ICs, followed by compomers, whereas composites are relatively stable. Reactmer Paste exhibits rapid and extensive expansion and should probably be avoided in tooth preparations that involve thin unsupported enamel.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherQuintessence Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.quintessencepublishing.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=3&products_id=243en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Adhesive Dentistryen_US
dc.subject.meshAcid Etching, Dentalen_US
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshBisphenol A-Glycidyl Methacrylateen_US
dc.subject.meshCompomers - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshComposite Resins - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshDentin-Bonding Agents - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshGlass - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshGlass Ionomer Cements - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHydrofluoric Acid - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshPolyethylene Glycols - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymethacrylic Acids - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshResin Cements - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshResins, Synthetic - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshSilanes - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshSilicates - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshSilicones - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshSurface Propertiesen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshWater - Chemistryen_US
dc.titleThe influence of hygroscopic expansion of resin-based restorative materials on artificial gap reductionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, GSP:spcheung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, GSP=rp00016en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid12071630-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036490755en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros72304-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036490755&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume4en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage61en_US
dc.identifier.epage71en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, C=9747406100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKei, LH=6602484458en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, SHY=7401765260en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, GSP=7005809531en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTay, FR=7102091962en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPashley, DH=35448600800en_US

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