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Article: Acoustic and perceptual analysis of the sibilant sound /s/ before and after orthognathic surgery

TitleAcoustic and perceptual analysis of the sibilant sound /s/ before and after orthognathic surgery
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/joms
Citation
Journal Of Oral And Maxillofacial Surgery, 2002, v. 60 n. 4, p. 364-372 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: Orthognathic surgery may have a positive or negative effect on speech. Perceptual evaluation of presurgical and postsurgical articulation is difficult because speech errors, when they occur, are usually fricative distortions, which may be difficult to document reliably. In this study, acoustic analysis was used to supplement perceptual judgment of presurgical and postsurgical productions of /s/. Subjects and Methods: The study population consisted of 9 Cantonese speakers undergoing osteotomy for Class III skeletal deformity and 9 age- and gender-matched adults with normal occlusion and speech. The speech sample consisted of 6 words with the initial sibilant sound /s/. Perceptual analysis included narrow phonetic transcription and classification of error types. Acoustic analysis included measurement of first and second spectral peaks, fricative duration, noise bandwidth, and noise-to-vowel decibel ratio. Results: The results of the perceptual analysis showed a decrease in articulatory errors for the group after surgery, although 5 patients had no perceptual errors before surgery. Acoustic analysis showed significant differences between the experimental and control groups before surgery for 2 variables (spectral peak I and bandwidth). Three months after surgery there were no significant differences between the control group and the experimental group, except for bandwidth. Twelve months after surgery, there were significant differences between the 2 groups in noise bandwidth and spectral peak II. Conclusions: The results suggest a possible relapse at 1 year after surgery, based on spectral peak values. Osteotomy appears to result in a positive change in articulation for most patients, but speech outcome after osteotomy must be evaluated both 1 year and shortly after surgery. © 2002 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154183
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.631
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.824
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, ASYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWhitehill, TLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCiocca, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamman, Nen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:23:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:23:45Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Oral And Maxillofacial Surgery, 2002, v. 60 n. 4, p. 364-372en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0278-2391en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154183-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Orthognathic surgery may have a positive or negative effect on speech. Perceptual evaluation of presurgical and postsurgical articulation is difficult because speech errors, when they occur, are usually fricative distortions, which may be difficult to document reliably. In this study, acoustic analysis was used to supplement perceptual judgment of presurgical and postsurgical productions of /s/. Subjects and Methods: The study population consisted of 9 Cantonese speakers undergoing osteotomy for Class III skeletal deformity and 9 age- and gender-matched adults with normal occlusion and speech. The speech sample consisted of 6 words with the initial sibilant sound /s/. Perceptual analysis included narrow phonetic transcription and classification of error types. Acoustic analysis included measurement of first and second spectral peaks, fricative duration, noise bandwidth, and noise-to-vowel decibel ratio. Results: The results of the perceptual analysis showed a decrease in articulatory errors for the group after surgery, although 5 patients had no perceptual errors before surgery. Acoustic analysis showed significant differences between the experimental and control groups before surgery for 2 variables (spectral peak I and bandwidth). Three months after surgery there were no significant differences between the control group and the experimental group, except for bandwidth. Twelve months after surgery, there were significant differences between the 2 groups in noise bandwidth and spectral peak II. Conclusions: The results suggest a possible relapse at 1 year after surgery, based on spectral peak values. Osteotomy appears to result in a positive change in articulation for most patients, but speech outcome after osteotomy must be evaluated both 1 year and shortly after surgery. © 2002 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jomsen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeryen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshArticulation Disorders - Diagnosis - Etiology - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshCephalometryen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMalocclusion, Angle Class Iii - Complications - Physiopathology - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshOral Surgical Proceduresen_US
dc.subject.meshRecurrenceen_US
dc.subject.meshReproducibility Of Resultsen_US
dc.subject.meshSound Spectrographyen_US
dc.subject.meshSpeech Articulation Testsen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.subject.meshVoice Qualityen_US
dc.titleAcoustic and perceptual analysis of the sibilant sound /s/ before and after orthognathic surgeryen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWhitehill, TL: tara@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamman, N: nsamman@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWhitehill, TL=rp00970en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamman, N=rp00021en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1053/joms.2002.31221en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11928089-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036204498en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros68040-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036204498&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume60en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage364en_HK
dc.identifier.epage372en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000174733900006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, ASY=16426099200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWhitehill, TL=7004098633en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCiocca, V=6604000275en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamman, N=7006413627en_HK

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