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Article: Comparison of pulse activation vs conventional light-curing on marginal adaptation of a compomer conditioned using a total-etch or a self-etch technique

TitleComparison of pulse activation vs conventional light-curing on marginal adaptation of a compomer conditioned using a total-etch or a self-etch technique
Authors
KeywordsDental Material
Light-Curing Technique
Marginal Quality
Restoration
Issue Date2002
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/dental
Citation
Dental Materials, 2002, v. 18 n. 1, p. 36-48 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: This study investigated the effect of two factors: conditioning methods and light-curing techniques on the marginal adaptation of Dyract AP (Dentsply DeTrey, Germany). The 'pulse activation' curing technique was compared with a conventional light-curing technique for their effectiveness in reducing marginal gaps in restorations that were conditioned with three different protocols. Materials and methods: Cylindrical cavities, 3mm in diameter, were prepared in extracted human molar teeth. They were restored with Dyract AP using Prime&Bond NT (PBNT; Dentsply DeTrey) as the adhesive. Cavities were etched with: Conditioner36/PBNT (group 1), Non-Rinse Conditioner (NRC)/PBNT (group 2), and PBNT only (group 3). Either conventional or the 'pulse activation' technique was used for light-curing of the material. Epoxy resin replicas were obtained from longitudinal sections of the specimens, and the restoration-tooth interfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Marginal qualities along the resin-dentin interfaces were further measured using image analysis and analyzed using nonparametric statistical methods. Results: With the conventional curing technique, enamel margin fractures were frequently observed. Marginal gaps were found along the compomer-dentin interfaces irrespective of the conditioning protocol. A significantly lower percentage of gap-containing margins were found in cavities that were conditioned with 36% phosphoric acid. With the 'pulse activation' technique, no marginal gap was found along compomer-dentin interfaces that were etched with either Conditioner36 or NRC. More than 90% of the total margin length were excellent. No cohesive failure of enamel could be observed along cavosurface margins. Significance: The 'pulse activation' curing technique significantly improves the marginal integrity of Dyract AP when Conditioner36/Prime&Bond NT and NRC/Prime&Bond NT are used as conditioning/bonding systems. The use of Prime&Bond NT without etching is not recommended, as marginal gaps are present irrespective of the curing techniques employed. © 2002 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154182
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.931
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.339
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWei, SHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorTay, FRen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:23:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:23:45Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationDental Materials, 2002, v. 18 n. 1, p. 36-48en_US
dc.identifier.issn0109-5641en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154182-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This study investigated the effect of two factors: conditioning methods and light-curing techniques on the marginal adaptation of Dyract AP (Dentsply DeTrey, Germany). The 'pulse activation' curing technique was compared with a conventional light-curing technique for their effectiveness in reducing marginal gaps in restorations that were conditioned with three different protocols. Materials and methods: Cylindrical cavities, 3mm in diameter, were prepared in extracted human molar teeth. They were restored with Dyract AP using Prime&Bond NT (PBNT; Dentsply DeTrey) as the adhesive. Cavities were etched with: Conditioner36/PBNT (group 1), Non-Rinse Conditioner (NRC)/PBNT (group 2), and PBNT only (group 3). Either conventional or the 'pulse activation' technique was used for light-curing of the material. Epoxy resin replicas were obtained from longitudinal sections of the specimens, and the restoration-tooth interfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Marginal qualities along the resin-dentin interfaces were further measured using image analysis and analyzed using nonparametric statistical methods. Results: With the conventional curing technique, enamel margin fractures were frequently observed. Marginal gaps were found along the compomer-dentin interfaces irrespective of the conditioning protocol. A significantly lower percentage of gap-containing margins were found in cavities that were conditioned with 36% phosphoric acid. With the 'pulse activation' technique, no marginal gap was found along compomer-dentin interfaces that were etched with either Conditioner36 or NRC. More than 90% of the total margin length were excellent. No cohesive failure of enamel could be observed along cavosurface margins. Significance: The 'pulse activation' curing technique significantly improves the marginal integrity of Dyract AP when Conditioner36/Prime&Bond NT and NRC/Prime&Bond NT are used as conditioning/bonding systems. The use of Prime&Bond NT without etching is not recommended, as marginal gaps are present irrespective of the curing techniques employed. © 2002 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/dentalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofDental Materialsen_US
dc.subjectDental Materialen_US
dc.subjectLight-Curing Techniqueen_US
dc.subjectMarginal Qualityen_US
dc.subjectRestorationen_US
dc.titleComparison of pulse activation vs conventional light-curing on marginal adaptation of a compomer conditioned using a total-etch or a self-etch techniqueen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, ECM:hrdplcm@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ECM=rp00015en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0109-5641(01)00018-5en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036134584en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros68616-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036134584&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage36en_US
dc.identifier.epage48en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000173318300005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuo, Y=49161174100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, ECM=7101705982en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, SHY=7401765260en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTay, FR=7102091962en_US

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