File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Temporal and local appearance of alkaline phosphatase activity in early stages of guided bone regeneration: A descriptive histochemical study in humans

TitleTemporal and local appearance of alkaline phosphatase activity in early stages of guided bone regeneration: A descriptive histochemical study in humans
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2001, v. 12 n. 2, p. 121-127 How to Cite?
AbstractAlkaline phosphatase (ALP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphate esters and it seems to be a prerequisite for normal skeletal mineralization. Also, ALP is the most widely recognized marker of osteoblast phenotypes. By a tissue regenerative technique called Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR), it is possible nowadays to regenerate small bony defects. The aim of the present study was to investigate early events in bone healing and neogenesis by studying histochemically the temporal and local appearance of the marker Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) in a GBR model system. Nine healthy volunteers (5 males, 4 females, mean age 31.7 years) participated in the experiment. After raising a mucoperiosteal flap from the mandibular second molar to the retromolar area in each volunteer, a hollow titanium test cylinder was placed into a congruent bony bed and the coronal end of the cylinder was closed with an ePTFE-membrane. Then the flap was adapted and sutured to obtain primary wound closure. After 2, 7 and 12 weeks, the regenerated tissue within the cylinders was harvested. Histologically, ALP activity was observed associated with the osteoid seams in the very basal part of the regenerate where new bone trabeculae were in the process of being formed. More coronally, large round cells seemed to secrete an ALP-positive substance since in the center of such cell clusters strong ALP activity located extracellularly was detected. In the present experiment, ALP seemed to have been an early sign of osteoblast secretion of a matrix which subsequently was determined to become osteoid. ALP activity was never seen isolated within connective tissue and away from bone. This is an indication that its source is linked to existing bone. The present study has documented for the first time the appearance of ALP activity in guided bone regenerations in humans. It has revealed that: 1) Osteogenesis in guided bone regeneration is preceded by localized, marked expression of ALP in an organized connective tissue environment. 2) Bone neogenesis is an early event in this experimental setup and may be detected already 2 weeks after wounding. 3) Expression of ALP and subsequent bone neogenesis is originating from and topographically linked to pre-existing bone structures. Copyright © Munksgaard 2001.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154154
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.464
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.427
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStucki, Uen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchmid, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorHämmerle, CFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:23:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:23:34Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2001, v. 12 n. 2, p. 121-127en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154154-
dc.description.abstractAlkaline phosphatase (ALP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphate esters and it seems to be a prerequisite for normal skeletal mineralization. Also, ALP is the most widely recognized marker of osteoblast phenotypes. By a tissue regenerative technique called Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR), it is possible nowadays to regenerate small bony defects. The aim of the present study was to investigate early events in bone healing and neogenesis by studying histochemically the temporal and local appearance of the marker Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) in a GBR model system. Nine healthy volunteers (5 males, 4 females, mean age 31.7 years) participated in the experiment. After raising a mucoperiosteal flap from the mandibular second molar to the retromolar area in each volunteer, a hollow titanium test cylinder was placed into a congruent bony bed and the coronal end of the cylinder was closed with an ePTFE-membrane. Then the flap was adapted and sutured to obtain primary wound closure. After 2, 7 and 12 weeks, the regenerated tissue within the cylinders was harvested. Histologically, ALP activity was observed associated with the osteoid seams in the very basal part of the regenerate where new bone trabeculae were in the process of being formed. More coronally, large round cells seemed to secrete an ALP-positive substance since in the center of such cell clusters strong ALP activity located extracellularly was detected. In the present experiment, ALP seemed to have been an early sign of osteoblast secretion of a matrix which subsequently was determined to become osteoid. ALP activity was never seen isolated within connective tissue and away from bone. This is an indication that its source is linked to existing bone. The present study has documented for the first time the appearance of ALP activity in guided bone regenerations in humans. It has revealed that: 1) Osteogenesis in guided bone regeneration is preceded by localized, marked expression of ALP in an organized connective tissue environment. 2) Bone neogenesis is an early event in this experimental setup and may be detected already 2 weeks after wounding. 3) Expression of ALP and subsequent bone neogenesis is originating from and topographically linked to pre-existing bone structures. Copyright © Munksgaard 2001.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAlkaline Phosphatase - Biosynthesisen_US
dc.subject.meshAlveolar Process - Enzymologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Regeneration - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implantation, Endosseousen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implantsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGuided Tissue Regeneration, Periodontalen_US
dc.subject.meshHistocytochemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMandibleen_US
dc.subject.meshMembranes, Artificialen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOsteoblasts - Enzymologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPolytetrafluoroethyleneen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titleTemporal and local appearance of alkaline phosphatase activity in early stages of guided bone regeneration: A descriptive histochemical study in humansen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid11251661-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035315760en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035315760&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage121en_US
dc.identifier.epage127en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000167530400005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStucki, U=6507800236en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchmid, J=8419181200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHämmerle, CF=7005331844en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats