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Article: Length changes in the human masseter muscle after jaw movement

TitleLength changes in the human masseter muscle after jaw movement
Authors
Issue Date2001
Citation
Anatomical Record, 2001, v. 262 n. 3, p. 293-300 How to Cite?
AbstractThe human masseter is a multilayered, complex muscle contributing to jaw motion. Because variations in stretch may cause muscle fibers to function over different portions of their length-tension curves, the aim of this study was to determine how parts of the masseter lengthen or shorten during voluntary jaw movements made by living subjects. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and optically-based jaw-tracking were used to measure muscle-insertion positions for four parts of the muscle with six degrees of freedom (DOF), before and after maximum-opening, jaw protrusion and laterotrusion in four adult males. Muscle part lengths and intramuscular tendon lengths were calculated, and these data, with fiber-tendon ratios published previously, were used to estimate putative changes in fiber-length. During maximum jaw-opening, the largest increases in muscle length (34-83%) occurred in the medial part of the deep masseter, whereas the smallest changes occurred in the posterior-most, superficial masseter (2-19%). Smaller changes were found during movement to the ipsilateral side, than during protrusion and movement to the contralateral side. On maximum opening, putative fibers in the deep masseter lengthened up to 83%, whereas those of the superficial masseter stretched up to 72%. The masseter muscle does not stretch uniformly for major jaw movement. Jaw motion to the ipsilateral side causes little length change in any part, and the effect of tendon-stretch on estimated fiber lengths is not substantial. The stretch that occurs infers there are task-related changes in the active and passive tensions produced by different muscle regions. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154152
ISSN
2004 Impact Factor: 3.147
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.741
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGoto, TKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLangenbach, GEJen_US
dc.contributor.authorHannam, AGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:23:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:23:34Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnatomical Record, 2001, v. 262 n. 3, p. 293-300en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-276Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154152-
dc.description.abstractThe human masseter is a multilayered, complex muscle contributing to jaw motion. Because variations in stretch may cause muscle fibers to function over different portions of their length-tension curves, the aim of this study was to determine how parts of the masseter lengthen or shorten during voluntary jaw movements made by living subjects. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and optically-based jaw-tracking were used to measure muscle-insertion positions for four parts of the muscle with six degrees of freedom (DOF), before and after maximum-opening, jaw protrusion and laterotrusion in four adult males. Muscle part lengths and intramuscular tendon lengths were calculated, and these data, with fiber-tendon ratios published previously, were used to estimate putative changes in fiber-length. During maximum jaw-opening, the largest increases in muscle length (34-83%) occurred in the medial part of the deep masseter, whereas the smallest changes occurred in the posterior-most, superficial masseter (2-19%). Smaller changes were found during movement to the ipsilateral side, than during protrusion and movement to the contralateral side. On maximum opening, putative fibers in the deep masseter lengthened up to 83%, whereas those of the superficial masseter stretched up to 72%. The masseter muscle does not stretch uniformly for major jaw movement. Jaw motion to the ipsilateral side causes little length change in any part, and the effect of tendon-stretch on estimated fiber lengths is not substantial. The stretch that occurs infers there are task-related changes in the active and passive tensions produced by different muscle regions. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAnatomical Recorden_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshJaw - Anatomy & Histology - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMasseter Muscle - Anatomy & Histology - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshMovement - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle Contraction - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle Fibers, Skeletal - Cytology - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshOptics And Photonicsen_US
dc.subject.meshTendons - Anatomy & Histology - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleLength changes in the human masseter muscle after jaw movementen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGoto, TK:gototk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGoto, TK=rp01434en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/1097-0185(20010301)262:3<293::AID-AR1043>3.0.CO;2-Ben_US
dc.identifier.pmid11241197-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035282848en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035282848&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume262en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage293en_US
dc.identifier.epage300en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000167113800006-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGoto, TK=7403938313en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLangenbach, GEJ=35545981800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHannam, AG=7003996385en_US

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