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Article: Single stage surgery combining transmucosal implant placement with guided bone regeneration and bioresorbable materials

TitleSingle stage surgery combining transmucosal implant placement with guided bone regeneration and bioresorbable materials
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2001, v. 12 n. 1, p. 9-18 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim of the present clinical study was to test whether peri-implant bone defects can successfully be filled with bone by applying bioresorbable materials for guided bone regeneration (GBR) procedures in conjunction with implants in the transmucosal healing position. Three women and 7 men ranging in age from 32 to 68 years (median 54.5) needed tooth replacement with dental implants. Eightto 14 weeks following careful tooth extraction, implants of the ITI® Dental Implant System were placed at the extraction sites. At this time, all implants presented dehiscence defects of the alveolar bone partly exposing the rough titanium plasma sprayed (TPS) surfaces. GBR procedures were performed using deproteinized bovine bone mineral (Bio-Oss®) asa membrane-supporting material and a bioresorbable collagen membrane (Bio-Gide®) as a barrier. The membranes and the flaps were adjusted to fit around the necks of the implants, thus leaving the implants extending transmucosally into the oral cavity. Clinical measurements were taken at 6 sites around each implant (mesio-buccal, buccal, disto-buccal, disto-lingual, lingual, mesio-lingual) using a calibrated periodontal probe. These included:i) defect depth measured from the shoulder of the implant to the first bone-to-implant contact, ii) infrabony defect component measured from the bone crest to the first bone-to-implant contact, iii) defect width measured from the crest to the implant body in a direction perpendicular to the long axis of the implant. The Wilcoxon Matched Pairs Signed Rank Test was applied to detect differences overtime. At baseline, the mean defect depth per patient amounted to 3.6 mm (Standard Deviation 1.6 mm, range 1.8-6.8 mm). The deepest extensions of the defects were located at the buccal aspects (mean 7.8 mm, SD 1.9 mm). At re-entry, the mean defect had decreased to 2.5 mm (SD 0.6 mm). This difference was statistically significant (P<0.01). Initially, in 62% of sites the depth ranged from 0-3 mm, in 23% it ranged from 2-4 mm, and in 15% it amounted to more than 6 mm. Six to 7 months later, at re-entry, 95% of sites were 3 mm and less in depth and 5% ranged from 4-6 mm. Defect resolution, as assessed by the amount of coverage of the initially exposed rough implant surface, reached a mean value of 86% (SD 33 %). One hundred percent resolution was accomplished at 8 out of 10 implants, 60% at one and 0% at another implant. The tissue at the latter implant showed signs of infection and inflammation during the healing phase. It is concluded that bioresorbable materials in GBR procedures at transmucosal implants can lead to successful bone regeneration into periimplant defects. Copyright © Munksgaard 2001.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154150
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.464
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.427
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHämmerle, CHFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:23:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:23:33Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2001, v. 12 n. 1, p. 9-18en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154150-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the present clinical study was to test whether peri-implant bone defects can successfully be filled with bone by applying bioresorbable materials for guided bone regeneration (GBR) procedures in conjunction with implants in the transmucosal healing position. Three women and 7 men ranging in age from 32 to 68 years (median 54.5) needed tooth replacement with dental implants. Eightto 14 weeks following careful tooth extraction, implants of the ITI® Dental Implant System were placed at the extraction sites. At this time, all implants presented dehiscence defects of the alveolar bone partly exposing the rough titanium plasma sprayed (TPS) surfaces. GBR procedures were performed using deproteinized bovine bone mineral (Bio-Oss®) asa membrane-supporting material and a bioresorbable collagen membrane (Bio-Gide®) as a barrier. The membranes and the flaps were adjusted to fit around the necks of the implants, thus leaving the implants extending transmucosally into the oral cavity. Clinical measurements were taken at 6 sites around each implant (mesio-buccal, buccal, disto-buccal, disto-lingual, lingual, mesio-lingual) using a calibrated periodontal probe. These included:i) defect depth measured from the shoulder of the implant to the first bone-to-implant contact, ii) infrabony defect component measured from the bone crest to the first bone-to-implant contact, iii) defect width measured from the crest to the implant body in a direction perpendicular to the long axis of the implant. The Wilcoxon Matched Pairs Signed Rank Test was applied to detect differences overtime. At baseline, the mean defect depth per patient amounted to 3.6 mm (Standard Deviation 1.6 mm, range 1.8-6.8 mm). The deepest extensions of the defects were located at the buccal aspects (mean 7.8 mm, SD 1.9 mm). At re-entry, the mean defect had decreased to 2.5 mm (SD 0.6 mm). This difference was statistically significant (P<0.01). Initially, in 62% of sites the depth ranged from 0-3 mm, in 23% it ranged from 2-4 mm, and in 15% it amounted to more than 6 mm. Six to 7 months later, at re-entry, 95% of sites were 3 mm and less in depth and 5% ranged from 4-6 mm. Defect resolution, as assessed by the amount of coverage of the initially exposed rough implant surface, reached a mean value of 86% (SD 33 %). One hundred percent resolution was accomplished at 8 out of 10 implants, 60% at one and 0% at another implant. The tissue at the latter implant showed signs of infection and inflammation during the healing phase. It is concluded that bioresorbable materials in GBR procedures at transmucosal implants can lead to successful bone regeneration into periimplant defects. Copyright © Munksgaard 2001.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAbsorbable Implantsen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAlveolar Bone Loss - Classification - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshAlveolar Process - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Matrix - Transplantationen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Regeneration - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Substitutes - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshCattleen_US
dc.subject.meshCoated Materials, Biocompatibleen_US
dc.subject.meshCollagenen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implantation, Endosseousen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implantsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshGuided Tissue Regeneration, Periodontal - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMembranes, Artificialen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMinerals - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshOsteitis - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontics - Instrumentationen_US
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametricen_US
dc.subject.meshSurgical Wound Infection - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTitaniumen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.subject.meshWound Healing - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleSingle stage surgery combining transmucosal implant placement with guided bone regeneration and bioresorbable materialsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid11168266-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035256341en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035256341&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage9en_US
dc.identifier.epage18en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000166508600002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHämmerle, CHF=7005331848en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US

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