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Article: Effect of processing method on the dimensional accuracy and water sorption of acrylic resin dentures.

TitleEffect of processing method on the dimensional accuracy and water sorption of acrylic resin dentures.
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/prosdent
Citation
The Journal Of Prosthetic Dentistry, 1999, v. 81 n. 3, p. 300-304 How to Cite?
AbstractSTATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Acrylic resin complete dentures exhibit certain unavoidable dimensional changes. Processing shrinkage and expansion due to water uptake are 2 important aspects influencing dimensional accuracy. PURPOSE: This study investigated linear dimensional changes and water sorption of dentures processed by dry and wet heat with different rates of cooling. METHODS: Fine crosses marked on tinfoil inserts were placed at the incisive papilla and tuberosity regions of edentulous maxillary casts and incorporated into the dentures during polymerization by 3 processing techniques. A traveling microscope was used to measure the distances between the reference points to determine dimensional changes. Water uptake and content were determined by the mass changes of the dentures with an electronic balance. Data of linear dimensional change and water sorption were analyzed by multivariate analysis of variance and analysis of variance, respectively. Bonferroni simultaneous confidence intervals (95%) were applied for multiple comparison. RESULTS: Dry heat-processed and water bath-processed acrylic resin dentures did not exhibit significant differences in shrinkage (0.42% to 0.58%) at water saturation. Amounts of water sorption of dentures processed by dry and wet heat (0.50 and 0.48 mass%, respectively) were not significantly different, and their associated expansion did not entirely compensate for the processing shrinkage. The initial water content of dry heat-processed dentures (1.77 mass%) was unexpectedly slightly higher than that of wet heat-processed dentures (1.68 mass%). The rate at which the dentures cooled did not affect their initial water content and subsequent water uptake. CONCLUSIONS: Water uptake of dry and wet heat-processed acrylic resin dentures after deflasking was in both cases low, and the dentures did not reveal significant differences in shrinkage at water saturation. Air oven-processed and water bath-processed acrylic resin dentures show similar dimensional shrinkage at water saturation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154058
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 1.753
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.507
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, DMen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, LYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChow, TWen_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, RKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:23:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:23:03Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal Of Prosthetic Dentistry, 1999, v. 81 n. 3, p. 300-304en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3913en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154058-
dc.description.abstractSTATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Acrylic resin complete dentures exhibit certain unavoidable dimensional changes. Processing shrinkage and expansion due to water uptake are 2 important aspects influencing dimensional accuracy. PURPOSE: This study investigated linear dimensional changes and water sorption of dentures processed by dry and wet heat with different rates of cooling. METHODS: Fine crosses marked on tinfoil inserts were placed at the incisive papilla and tuberosity regions of edentulous maxillary casts and incorporated into the dentures during polymerization by 3 processing techniques. A traveling microscope was used to measure the distances between the reference points to determine dimensional changes. Water uptake and content were determined by the mass changes of the dentures with an electronic balance. Data of linear dimensional change and water sorption were analyzed by multivariate analysis of variance and analysis of variance, respectively. Bonferroni simultaneous confidence intervals (95%) were applied for multiple comparison. RESULTS: Dry heat-processed and water bath-processed acrylic resin dentures did not exhibit significant differences in shrinkage (0.42% to 0.58%) at water saturation. Amounts of water sorption of dentures processed by dry and wet heat (0.50 and 0.48 mass%, respectively) were not significantly different, and their associated expansion did not entirely compensate for the processing shrinkage. The initial water content of dry heat-processed dentures (1.77 mass%) was unexpectedly slightly higher than that of wet heat-processed dentures (1.68 mass%). The rate at which the dentures cooled did not affect their initial water content and subsequent water uptake. CONCLUSIONS: Water uptake of dry and wet heat-processed acrylic resin dentures after deflasking was in both cases low, and the dentures did not reveal significant differences in shrinkage at water saturation. Air oven-processed and water bath-processed acrylic resin dentures show similar dimensional shrinkage at water saturation.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/prosdenten_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe Journal of prosthetic dentistryen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Copyright © Mosby, Inc.-
dc.subject.meshAcrylic Resins - Analysis - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshChemistry, Physicalen_US
dc.subject.meshConfidence Intervalsen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshDenture, Completeen_US
dc.subject.meshHot Temperatureen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshJaw, Edentulousen_US
dc.subject.meshMaxillaen_US
dc.subject.meshMultivariate Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysicochemical Phenomenaen_US
dc.subject.meshSurface Propertiesen_US
dc.subject.meshWater - Analysis - Chemistryen_US
dc.titleEffect of processing method on the dimensional accuracy and water sorption of acrylic resin dentures.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChow, TW:twchow@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChow, TW=rp00009en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0022-3913(99)70273-8-
dc.identifier.pmid10050118-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033087044en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros45821-
dc.identifier.volume81en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage300en_US
dc.identifier.epage304en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000079434600009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DM=21637886000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, LY=8876263800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, TW=7203012369en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridClark, RK=7406318698en_US

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