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Article: The biological effect of natural bone mineral on bone neoformation on the rabbit skull

TitleThe biological effect of natural bone mineral on bone neoformation on the rabbit skull
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 1997, v. 8 n. 3, p. 198-207 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of deproteinized bovine bone graft material on new bone formation in a guided bone regeneration model system. In 20 rabbits, a periosteal skin flap was raised uncovering the calvaria. A form stable hemispherical dome made of poly-lactic acid (PLA) was placed onto the roughened calvaria. Prior to placement, the dome was either filled with peripheral blood alone (control group, 8 rabbits), or with blood and OsteoGraf®/N-300 (test group, 12 rabbits). The wound was closed for primary healing. Morphometric assessment of 1- and 2-month undecalcified histologic specimens revealed better tissue fill in the test domes at 1 month (test 99%, control 55%) (P<0.05) and 2 months (t, 100%; c, 82%). The fraction of the new bone within the regenerated tissue was higher in the test specimens at 1 month (t, 22%; c, 12%) (P<0.05) and 2 months (t, 34%; c, 24%). The fraction of the entire space underneath the domes occupied by bone was higher in the test at 1 month, but higher in the controls at 2 months. The fraction of the bone substitute material in contact with bone increased from 1 month (34%±14) to 2 months (45%±5). The surface fraction of osteoblast layers was tendentially higher in the test at 1 month but higher in the control specimens at 2 months. In both test and control, initially woven bone was formed which underwent subsequent remodeling. Cellular degradation of the deproteinized bone graft was frequently detected. It is concluded that deproteinized bovine bone mineral has osteoconductive properties and can initially accelerate new bone formation during guided bone regeneration by increased recruitment of osteoblasts. © Munksgaard 1997.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153996
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.464
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.427
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHämmerle, CHFen_US
dc.contributor.authorOlah, AJen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchmid, OJen_US
dc.contributor.authorFlückiger, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorGogolewski, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorWinkler, JRen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:22:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:22:43Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 1997, v. 8 n. 3, p. 198-207en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153996-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of deproteinized bovine bone graft material on new bone formation in a guided bone regeneration model system. In 20 rabbits, a periosteal skin flap was raised uncovering the calvaria. A form stable hemispherical dome made of poly-lactic acid (PLA) was placed onto the roughened calvaria. Prior to placement, the dome was either filled with peripheral blood alone (control group, 8 rabbits), or with blood and OsteoGraf®/N-300 (test group, 12 rabbits). The wound was closed for primary healing. Morphometric assessment of 1- and 2-month undecalcified histologic specimens revealed better tissue fill in the test domes at 1 month (test 99%, control 55%) (P<0.05) and 2 months (t, 100%; c, 82%). The fraction of the new bone within the regenerated tissue was higher in the test specimens at 1 month (t, 22%; c, 12%) (P<0.05) and 2 months (t, 34%; c, 24%). The fraction of the entire space underneath the domes occupied by bone was higher in the test at 1 month, but higher in the controls at 2 months. The fraction of the bone substitute material in contact with bone increased from 1 month (34%±14) to 2 months (45%±5). The surface fraction of osteoblast layers was tendentially higher in the test at 1 month but higher in the control specimens at 2 months. In both test and control, initially woven bone was formed which underwent subsequent remodeling. Cellular degradation of the deproteinized bone graft was frequently detected. It is concluded that deproteinized bovine bone mineral has osteoconductive properties and can initially accelerate new bone formation during guided bone regeneration by increased recruitment of osteoblasts. © Munksgaard 1997.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Demineralization Techniqueen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Regenerationen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Substitutesen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Transplantation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshCattleen_US
dc.subject.meshGuided Tissue Regeneration - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshLactic Aciden_US
dc.subject.meshOsteogenesisen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymersen_US
dc.subject.meshRabbitsen_US
dc.subject.meshSkull - Surgeryen_US
dc.titleThe biological effect of natural bone mineral on bone neoformation on the rabbit skullen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid9586464en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031152206en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031152206&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage198en_US
dc.identifier.epage207en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997XE16000006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHämmerle, CHF=7005331848en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOlah, AJ=7006654753en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchmid, OJ=8415809400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFlückiger, L=8419181400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGogolewski, S=7004684875en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWinkler, JR=7202100729en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US

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