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Article: The vascular anatomy of the human temporalis muscle: Implications for surgical splitting techniques

TitleThe vascular anatomy of the human temporalis muscle: Implications for surgical splitting techniques
Authors
Issue Date1996
PublisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijom
Citation
International Journal Of Oral And Maxillofacial Surgery, 1996, v. 25 n. 6, p. 414-421 How to Cite?
AbstractDespite the wide application of the temporalis muscle flap and its modifications, understanding of the vascular pattern and territories within the muscle remains poor. This study aimed to evaluate the vascular architecture in the human temporalis muscle for surgical application. The material comprised 15 fresh cadavers (30 muscle specimens), which were divided into three groups for vascular infusion by either Indian ink solution, lead oxide solution, or methylmethacrylate resin. The vascular network in the temporalis muscle was analyzed by stereomicroscopy, radiography, and scanning electron microscopy. The human temporalis muscle was found to have vascular supply from three primary arteries: the anterior deep temporal artery (ADTA), the posterior deep temporal artery (PDTA), and the middle temporal artery (MTA). Each primary artery branched into the secondary arterioles and then the terminal arterioles. The venous network accompanied the arteries, and double veins pairing one artery was a common finding. The capillaries formed a dense, interlacing network with orientation along the muscle fibres. Arteriovenous anastomosis was absent. In the coronal plane, the vessels were located mainly on the lateral and medial aspects of the muscle with a significantly lower vascular density in the midline. Morphometric analysis of the arterial network showed that the PDTA was larger in size at primary and secondary branching levels than the ADTA and the MTA, whereas no differences were present at the terminal arteriolar levels. The distribution of the arterial territories was as follows: the ADTA occupied 21% anteriorly, the PDTA occupied 41% in the middle region, and the MTA occupied 38% in the posterior region. This improved understanding of the vascular architecture within the temporalis muscle complements the anatomic basis of the flap-splitting technique and increases the safety of its application.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153984
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.563
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.854
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, LKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:22:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:22:39Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Oral And Maxillofacial Surgery, 1996, v. 25 n. 6, p. 414-421en_US
dc.identifier.issn0901-5027en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153984-
dc.description.abstractDespite the wide application of the temporalis muscle flap and its modifications, understanding of the vascular pattern and territories within the muscle remains poor. This study aimed to evaluate the vascular architecture in the human temporalis muscle for surgical application. The material comprised 15 fresh cadavers (30 muscle specimens), which were divided into three groups for vascular infusion by either Indian ink solution, lead oxide solution, or methylmethacrylate resin. The vascular network in the temporalis muscle was analyzed by stereomicroscopy, radiography, and scanning electron microscopy. The human temporalis muscle was found to have vascular supply from three primary arteries: the anterior deep temporal artery (ADTA), the posterior deep temporal artery (PDTA), and the middle temporal artery (MTA). Each primary artery branched into the secondary arterioles and then the terminal arterioles. The venous network accompanied the arteries, and double veins pairing one artery was a common finding. The capillaries formed a dense, interlacing network with orientation along the muscle fibres. Arteriovenous anastomosis was absent. In the coronal plane, the vessels were located mainly on the lateral and medial aspects of the muscle with a significantly lower vascular density in the midline. Morphometric analysis of the arterial network showed that the PDTA was larger in size at primary and secondary branching levels than the ADTA and the MTA, whereas no differences were present at the terminal arteriolar levels. The distribution of the arterial territories was as follows: the ADTA occupied 21% anteriorly, the PDTA occupied 41% in the middle region, and the MTA occupied 38% in the posterior region. This improved understanding of the vascular architecture within the temporalis muscle complements the anatomic basis of the flap-splitting technique and increases the safety of its application.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshCarbonen_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshColoring Agentsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHistocytological Preparation Techniquesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshLeaden_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMethylmethacrylateen_US
dc.subject.meshMethylmethacrylatesen_US
dc.subject.meshOxidesen_US
dc.subject.meshSurgical Flaps - Blood Supplyen_US
dc.subject.meshTemporal Arteries - Anatomy & Histologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTemporal Muscle - Blood Supply - Surgeryen_US
dc.titleThe vascular anatomy of the human temporalis muscle: Implications for surgical splitting techniquesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, LK:lkcheung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, LK=rp00013en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid8986540-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030344523en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros22196-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030344523&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage414en_US
dc.identifier.epage421en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996WA00100002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, LK=7102302747en_US

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