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Article: Successful bone fill in late peri-implant defects using guided tissue regeneration. A short communication.

TitleSuccessful bone fill in late peri-implant defects using guided tissue regeneration. A short communication.
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherAmerican Academy of Periodontology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perio.org
Citation
Journal Of Periodontology, 1995, v. 66 n. 4, p. 303-308 How to Cite?
AbstractSevere loss of peri-implant supporting bone traditionally leads to the removal of the affected implant, but this may not be necessary in all cases. This paper presents a novel treatment approach aimed at the successful regeneration of bone lost to peri-implantitis using guided tissue regeneration (GTR). Four years after implant placement two patients presented with severe peri-implant tissue breakdown. Clinical signs of disease included bleeding on probing, suppuration, increased probeable pocket depth (4 to 9 mm) and a decreased level of clinical attachment (2 to 10 mm). Radiographic analysis revealed 2.6 to 7.1 mm loss of supporting bone. Treatment of these lesions included raising flaps, wound debridement, and rinsing with sterile saline and 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate. Subsequently, ePTFE membranes were adapted around the necks of the implants and the flaps sutured around the necks of the implants, allowing for transmucosal healing. Both patients were placed on a 10-day antibiotic regimen and instructed to rinse twice daily with a 0.12% chlorhexidine solution. They were reevaluated every 3 weeks at which time professional plaque control was performed. After 4 1/2 and 6 1/2 months, respectively, the membranes required removal due to infection. The radiographic analysis 1 year after membrane removal revealed 1.5 to 3.6 mm of bone gain. As a result of regenerative therapy the implants in both these patients were successfully maintained. It can be concluded that implants with severe loss of bone resulting from peri-implantitis need not always be extracted. A potential approach for the treatment of peri-implant bone destruction is GTR therapy using strict attention to good antimicrobial therapy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153926
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.844
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.070
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHämmerle, CHen_US
dc.contributor.authorFourmousis, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorWinkler, JRen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeigel, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrägger, Uen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:22:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:22:19Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Periodontology, 1995, v. 66 n. 4, p. 303-308en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3492en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153926-
dc.description.abstractSevere loss of peri-implant supporting bone traditionally leads to the removal of the affected implant, but this may not be necessary in all cases. This paper presents a novel treatment approach aimed at the successful regeneration of bone lost to peri-implantitis using guided tissue regeneration (GTR). Four years after implant placement two patients presented with severe peri-implant tissue breakdown. Clinical signs of disease included bleeding on probing, suppuration, increased probeable pocket depth (4 to 9 mm) and a decreased level of clinical attachment (2 to 10 mm). Radiographic analysis revealed 2.6 to 7.1 mm loss of supporting bone. Treatment of these lesions included raising flaps, wound debridement, and rinsing with sterile saline and 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate. Subsequently, ePTFE membranes were adapted around the necks of the implants and the flaps sutured around the necks of the implants, allowing for transmucosal healing. Both patients were placed on a 10-day antibiotic regimen and instructed to rinse twice daily with a 0.12% chlorhexidine solution. They were reevaluated every 3 weeks at which time professional plaque control was performed. After 4 1/2 and 6 1/2 months, respectively, the membranes required removal due to infection. The radiographic analysis 1 year after membrane removal revealed 1.5 to 3.6 mm of bone gain. As a result of regenerative therapy the implants in both these patients were successfully maintained. It can be concluded that implants with severe loss of bone resulting from peri-implantitis need not always be extracted. A potential approach for the treatment of peri-implant bone destruction is GTR therapy using strict attention to good antimicrobial therapy.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Academy of Periodontology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perio.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Periodontologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAbsorptiometry, Photonen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAlveolar Bone Loss - Etiology - Radiography - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implants - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGuided Tissue Regeneration, Periodontalen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMandibular Diseases - Etiology - Radiography - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshSubtraction Techniqueen_US
dc.titleSuccessful bone fill in late peri-implant defects using guided tissue regeneration. A short communication.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid7782987-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029283399en_US
dc.identifier.volume66en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage303en_US
dc.identifier.epage308en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995QT71500011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHämmerle, CH=7005331848en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFourmousis, I=6602718088en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWinkler, JR=7202100729en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeigel, C=7005466378en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrägger, U=7005538598en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US

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