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Article: Chinese health beliefs and oral health practices among the middle-aged and the elderly in Hong Kong.

TitleChinese health beliefs and oral health practices among the middle-aged and the elderly in Hong Kong.
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COM
Citation
Community Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology, 1994, v. 22 n. 5 Pt 2, p. 364-368 How to Cite?
AbstractThe purpose of this paper was to study possible relationships between traditional Chinese health beliefs and health practices in adult Chinese in a modernized society. The study populations comprised 398 35-44-yr-old and 559 65-74-yr-old Hong Kong Chinese. The respondents were categorized into three groups with weak, moderate, or strong Chinese beliefs on the basis of interview questions on the causes of gum disease. Chinese preventive practices and Chinese pain practices were defined according to respondents' reported use of recommended traditional cures. Questions on generally accepted oral practices were phrased in terms of frequency of daily brushing of teeth, use of toothpicks the previous day, and whether or not teeth were flossed the previous day. Around one-third of the respondents had weak, almost one-half had moderate, and around one-quarter expressed strong Chinese health beliefs. No significant differences in Chinese health beliefs were found between men and women in either age group, or between the age groups. In the 35-44 age group, more of those with a higher education were in the "weak" Chinese health belief category, whereas, conversely, more of those with a lower education expressed stronger Chinese health beliefs (P < 0.05). Women in both age groups reported significantly more frequent brushing. Toothpicks were used by around three-quarters of both age groups, but flossing was extremely rare.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153900
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.233
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.111
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLim, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchwarz, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:22:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:22:10Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationCommunity Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology, 1994, v. 22 n. 5 Pt 2, p. 364-368en_US
dc.identifier.issn0301-5661en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153900-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper was to study possible relationships between traditional Chinese health beliefs and health practices in adult Chinese in a modernized society. The study populations comprised 398 35-44-yr-old and 559 65-74-yr-old Hong Kong Chinese. The respondents were categorized into three groups with weak, moderate, or strong Chinese beliefs on the basis of interview questions on the causes of gum disease. Chinese preventive practices and Chinese pain practices were defined according to respondents' reported use of recommended traditional cures. Questions on generally accepted oral practices were phrased in terms of frequency of daily brushing of teeth, use of toothpicks the previous day, and whether or not teeth were flossed the previous day. Around one-third of the respondents had weak, almost one-half had moderate, and around one-quarter expressed strong Chinese health beliefs. No significant differences in Chinese health beliefs were found between men and women in either age group, or between the age groups. In the 35-44 age group, more of those with a higher education were in the "weak" Chinese health belief category, whereas, conversely, more of those with a lower education expressed stronger Chinese health beliefs (P < 0.05). Women in both age groups reported significantly more frequent brushing. Toothpicks were used by around three-quarters of both age groups, but flossing was extremely rare.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCommunity dentistry and oral epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Health Surveysen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMedicine, Chinese Traditionalen_US
dc.subject.meshOral Hygieneen_US
dc.titleChinese health beliefs and oral health practices among the middle-aged and the elderly in Hong Kong.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, EC:hrdplcm@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLo, EC=rp00015en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid7835032-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028527773en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros3513-
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue5 Pt 2en_US
dc.identifier.spage364en_US
dc.identifier.epage368en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994PM53700005-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLim, LP=7401517261en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchwarz, E=7202730481en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, EC=7101705982en_US

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