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Article: The effect of indigenous bacterial populations on buccal epithelial cells on subsequent microbial adhesion in vitro

TitleThe effect of indigenous bacterial populations on buccal epithelial cells on subsequent microbial adhesion in vitro
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/OMI
Citation
Oral Microbiology and Immunology, 1994, v. 9 n. 4, p. 236-240 How to Cite?
AbstractDespite the numerous investigations on the adhesion of microorganisms to buccal epithelial cells, it is difficult to correlate different results, as disparate adherence values have been reported for a given organism. As one reason for this disparity may be the indigenous or natural bacterial populations on human buccal epithelial cells, the effect of the latter on subsequent microbial adherence in vitro was examined. There was a highly significant correlation between the degree of natural bacterial colonization on pooled buccal epithelial cells from 8 healthy donors and the adhesion of a single isolate each of Streptococcus mitis, Escherichia coli and Actinomyces naeslundii. However, no such relationship could be established for Candida albicans, Streptococcus milleri and another isolate of Streptococcus mitis. As in previous studies, variation in adherence values was found, both between samples from different donors, and from the same donor over time, but to a far lesser degree in pooled samples from different donors. These results imply that natural bacterial populations on buccal epithelial cells may affect the adhesion values derived from laboratory experimentation, and hence such data should be interpreted with caution.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153886
ISSN
2011 Impact Factor: 2.807
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, TWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:22:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:22:06Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationOral Microbiology and Immunology, 1994, v. 9 n. 4, p. 236-240en_US
dc.identifier.issn0902-0055en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153886-
dc.description.abstractDespite the numerous investigations on the adhesion of microorganisms to buccal epithelial cells, it is difficult to correlate different results, as disparate adherence values have been reported for a given organism. As one reason for this disparity may be the indigenous or natural bacterial populations on human buccal epithelial cells, the effect of the latter on subsequent microbial adherence in vitro was examined. There was a highly significant correlation between the degree of natural bacterial colonization on pooled buccal epithelial cells from 8 healthy donors and the adhesion of a single isolate each of Streptococcus mitis, Escherichia coli and Actinomyces naeslundii. However, no such relationship could be established for Candida albicans, Streptococcus milleri and another isolate of Streptococcus mitis. As in previous studies, variation in adherence values was found, both between samples from different donors, and from the same donor over time, but to a far lesser degree in pooled samples from different donors. These results imply that natural bacterial populations on buccal epithelial cells may affect the adhesion values derived from laboratory experimentation, and hence such data should be interpreted with caution.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/OMIen_US
dc.relation.ispartofOral Microbiology and Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshActinomyces - Isolation & Purification - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBacterial Adhesion - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCandida Albicans - Isolation & Purification - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distributionen_US
dc.subject.meshColony Count, Microbialen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Research - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshEcosystemen_US
dc.subject.meshEpithelial Cellsen_US
dc.subject.meshEpithelium - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEscherichia Coli - Isolation & Purification - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMouth Mucosa - Cytology - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshReproducibility Of Resultsen_US
dc.subject.meshStreptococcus - Isolation & Purification - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleThe effect of indigenous bacterial populations on buccal epithelial cells on subsequent microbial adhesion in vitroen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1399-302X.1994.tb00064.x-
dc.identifier.pmid7478764-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028484048en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros3550-
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage236en_US
dc.identifier.epage240en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994NV27800007-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHamilton, D=22134923800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacFarlane, TW=7005128465en_US

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