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Article: Digital image processing. II. In vitro quantitative evaluation of soft and hard peri-implant tissue changes.

TitleDigital image processing. II. In vitro quantitative evaluation of soft and hard peri-implant tissue changes.
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 1994, v. 5 n. 2, p. 105-114 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of computer-assisted densitometric image analysis (CADIA) to detect small changes in mineralized and nonmineralized tissues adjacent to dental implants and to correlate these changes with CADIA values. A section of a pig mandible including all soft tissues and in which a hollow cylinder ITI Bonefit implant with an artificial mesial and a buccal infrabony defect was placed was used to obtain pairs of standardized radiographs. Series of radiographs were obtained with exposure times of 0.13, 0.20, 0.44, and 0.53 s. Specimens of mineralized or nonmineralized tissues were placed arbitrarily in the defects before each radiographic exposure. The radiographs were captured through a video camera, digitized and stored in a personal computer. Every radiographic image was then subtracted from a baseline one without any change. The result of the subtraction was evaluated with CADIA. A linear correlation (r2 = 0.99) was found between the bone chips (1-5 mg of dry weight) placed in the mesial defect and the CADIA values. Bone chips in the buccal defect (behind the implant), however, were not detected unless their weight reached 14 mg or more. For conventionally exposed radiographs, it was not possible to recognize soft tissue specimens (1-6 mg), either in the buccal or the mesial defect. However, when "underexposed" radiographs (exposure time: 0.13 s) were obtained, a linear correlation (r2 = 0.80) was calculated for soft tissue specimens in the mesial defect and CADIA values. In normally exposed radiographs, the CADIA system could detect even the smallest change in bone density (bone chip of 1 mg of dry bone weight) and correlated almost linearly with these changes. Provided that the radiographic images are obtained with standardized geometry and normal exposure time, the tissue density changes detected by this system within bone defects represent only mineralized tissue changes. By underexposing radiographs, CADIA may even reveal soft tissue changes around dental implants.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153881
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.464
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.427
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFourmousis, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorBrägger, Uen_US
dc.contributor.authorBürgin, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorTonetti, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:22:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:22:04Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 1994, v. 5 n. 2, p. 105-114en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153881-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of computer-assisted densitometric image analysis (CADIA) to detect small changes in mineralized and nonmineralized tissues adjacent to dental implants and to correlate these changes with CADIA values. A section of a pig mandible including all soft tissues and in which a hollow cylinder ITI Bonefit implant with an artificial mesial and a buccal infrabony defect was placed was used to obtain pairs of standardized radiographs. Series of radiographs were obtained with exposure times of 0.13, 0.20, 0.44, and 0.53 s. Specimens of mineralized or nonmineralized tissues were placed arbitrarily in the defects before each radiographic exposure. The radiographs were captured through a video camera, digitized and stored in a personal computer. Every radiographic image was then subtracted from a baseline one without any change. The result of the subtraction was evaluated with CADIA. A linear correlation (r2 = 0.99) was found between the bone chips (1-5 mg of dry weight) placed in the mesial defect and the CADIA values. Bone chips in the buccal defect (behind the implant), however, were not detected unless their weight reached 14 mg or more. For conventionally exposed radiographs, it was not possible to recognize soft tissue specimens (1-6 mg), either in the buccal or the mesial defect. However, when "underexposed" radiographs (exposure time: 0.13 s) were obtained, a linear correlation (r2 = 0.80) was calculated for soft tissue specimens in the mesial defect and CADIA values. In normally exposed radiographs, the CADIA system could detect even the smallest change in bone density (bone chip of 1 mg of dry bone weight) and correlated almost linearly with these changes. Provided that the radiographic images are obtained with standardized geometry and normal exposure time, the tissue density changes detected by this system within bone defects represent only mineralized tissue changes. By underexposing radiographs, CADIA may even reveal soft tissue changes around dental implants.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical oral implants researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAbsorptiometry, Photonen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Implantsen_US
dc.subject.meshJaw, Edentulous - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshLinear Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshMandible - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshMatched-Pair Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontium - Radiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshRadiographic Image Enhancementen_US
dc.subject.meshRadiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisteden_US
dc.subject.meshSubtraction Techniqueen_US
dc.subject.meshSwineen_US
dc.titleDigital image processing. II. In vitro quantitative evaluation of soft and hard peri-implant tissue changes.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid7918909-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028456705en_US
dc.identifier.volume5en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage105en_US
dc.identifier.epage114en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994NP37700007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFourmousis, I=6602718088en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrägger, U=7005538598en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBürgin, W=7003413848en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTonetti, M=35602248900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US

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